Do I offend you?

By Robin Schumacher, Exclusive Columnist Monday, March 08, 2021

Today, it seems that many people are offended by everything and ashamed of nothing. And their rubbed-the-wrong-way attitude is typically accompanied by a hair trigger that goes off the instant something touches it.

Courtesy of Robin Schumacher

This dynamic has created a walking-on-eggshells society and an anxiety in people who now don’t feel comfortable respectfully expressing themselves because they’re afraid of offending someone who then brings the cancel culture down on them.

While I personally try to follow the Apostle Paul’s admonition of “If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men” (Rom. 12:18), I find that I still irk the world from time to time. And when I do, it’s usually for one of three reasons.

Because I am a Christian

One reason I might offend you is simply for the general fact that I’m a Christian. That alone could be enough for you to have ill feelings toward me. Perhaps you’re of the same mind as atheist Sam Harris who said, “If I could wave a magic wand and get rid of either rape or religion, I would not hesitate to get rid of religion. I think more people are dying as a result of our religious myths than as a result of any other ideology.” 

Harris’ point would be interesting if it were correct. In fact, the reverse is actually true and there’s plenty of proof to back up that assertion.

For example, read through Alvin Schmidt’s book, How Christianity Changed the World. The professor of sociology at Illinois College shows in page after page the central role Christianity has played in the development of hospitals, orphanages, science, music, education, literature, family values, women’s rights and more.

Or if you’re really feeling ambitious, tackle Kenneth Scott Latourette’s, seven-volume work A History of the Expansion of Christianity. The once professor of Church history at Yale University states this about the Christian faith:

“We have, and properly, had much to say about the effects of Christianity upon the collective life of communities, nations, and mankind as a whole. Here has been the most potent force which mankind has known for the dispelling of illiteracy, for the creation of schools, and for the emergence of new types of education…The universities, centers for pushing forward the boundaries of human knowledge, were at the outset largely Christian creations…. Music, architecture, painting, poetry, and philosophy have owed some of their greatest achievements to Christianity. Democracy, as it was known in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, was in large part the outgrowth of Christian teaching. The abolition of slavery was due chiefly to Christianity…. The most hopeful movements for the regulation of war, for the mitigation of the sufferings entailed by war, and for the eventual abolition of war owed their inception chiefly to the Christian faith. The nursing profession of the nineteenth century had the same origin, and the extension of Western methods of surgery and medicine too much of the non-Occidental world in that and the twentieth century was chiefly through the Christian missionary enterprise. The elevation of the status of women owed an incalculable debt to Christianity. Christian ideals made for monogamy and for a special kind of family life. No other single force has been so widely potent for the relief of suffering brought by famine and for the creation of hospitals and orphanages.”

As to the often-stated charge of religion historically being the number one cause for war, we have the work of Philip and Axelrod’s three-volume Encyclopedia of Wars, which chronicles some 1,763 wars that have been waged over the course of human history (up to 2004). They found that only 123 of history’s wars have a religious backbone, which means that 93% of all wars have been secular in nature. Of the 7% that were religious, 4% were attributed to Islam, leaving only 3% for all other religions including Christianity.

All that to say that I should not offend you simply because I’m a Christian.   

Because I believe there is only one way to God

Maybe I offend you because, given that I am a Christian, I believe that faith in Jesus is the only way to God. Perhaps that conviction strikes you as being arrogant, narrow-minded, and intolerant and you agree with Gandhi’s statement: “The soul of religion is one, but it is encased in a multitude of forms.”

There are two important things to consider here. First, every religion is exclusivistic in its teachings, so Christianity is not alone in that regard. The poet Steve Turner humorously underscores this point in his poem, Creed, when he says: “We believe that all religions are basically the same, at least the one that we read was. They all believe in love and goodness. They only differ on matters of creation, sin, heaven, hell, God and salvation.”  

Second, exclusivity is a daily life practice. Exclusivity is practiced in relationships, government, economics, medicine, mathematics, etc. In the same way it’s not intolerant to say that 2 + 2 = 4 or that there is only one medication in existence to cure an illness you have, it’s not unreasonable for a Christian to assert that Christ is the only way to Heaven.

That being true, my claim of salvation being found only in Christ should not offend you.  

Because I believe the Bible’s moral pronouncements

Perhaps I’m offensive because I believe what the Bible says about moral issues. Whether the matter is truth itself, life inside the womb, sexual relations, gender or something else, you become angry when I say I respect the Bible’s opinion on the subject and instead you take the position of atheist Christopher Hitchens who remarked, “What do I care what some Bronze Age text says about ?”  

But consider this: it’s one thing to condemn my Christian rationale for morality, but it’s quite another to intelligently (not emotionally) defend your own. Your moral epistemology must explain whether objective moral standards exist, and if so, from where do they come? Like C. S. Lewis wrote, “A man does not call a line crooked unless he has some idea of a straight line.”   

Unless you have an unchanging source for moral standards and authority – and outside of God there is none – then ethics become emotive (e.g. I don’t like rape vs. rape is wrong) and a tool to be used by the loudest and most aggressive mob voices. That, to me, seems more offensive than reasons for holding to what the Bible teaches about morals.

Does Jesus offend you?

Jesus obviously founded Christianity and had the audacity to say, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through Me” (John 14:6). That’s pretty narrow-minded thinking.  

And where the Bible’s moral teachings are concerned, Jesus said Scripture cannot be broken (John 10:35), that it is divinely authoritative (Matt. 4:1-10), imperishable (Matt. 24:35), is literal truth (John 17:17), and has ultimate supremacy (Matt. 15:6). Pretty heavy stuff for the rambunctious culture in which He lived.  

Jesus also said, “Blessed is he who does not take offense at Me” (Luke 7:23). The Greek word for “offense” is skandalizó, from where we get our word ‘scandal’.

Jesus was enough of a scandal in His day to get Himself killed. That’s how aggressive offended people can get, and sadly, we’re seeing violence of a similar nature in our own day directed towards those with a Christian (or even vaguely conservative) worldview. If you think this is an overblown statement, read any monthly issue of the Voice of the Martyrs newsletter.    

It’s my belief that, if I’m offensive, it’s not because Christianity is responsible for most of the ills in the world, or that it is exclusivistic, or that it has no good foundation for its moral positions. It’s because, if I’m reflecting Christ, I’m going to be odious to the world in the same way He was.

Paul states this fact plainly when he says, “For we are a fragrance of Christ to God among those who are being saved and among those who are perishing; to the one an aroma from death to death, to the other an aroma from life to life” (2 Cor. 2:15-16). About these verses, John MacArthur says, “To some, the message brings eternal life and ultimate glorification. To others, it is a stumbling stone of offense that brings eternal death.”   

If I offend you, that most likely means you are outside the Body of Christ and that’s the last thing in this world I want for you. Instead, it’s my hope that one day you’ll give the gospel biographies of Jesus a read for yourself, change your tune, and come to see the beauty and glory of Jesus.

Then we can be offensive together.  

Robin Schumacher is an accomplished software executive and Christian apologist who has written many articles, authored and contributed to several Christian books, appeared on nationally syndicated radio programs, and presented at apologetic events. He holds a BS in Business, Master’s in Christian apologetics and a Ph.D. in New Testament. His latest book is, A Confident Faith: Winning people to Christ with the apologetics of the Apostle Paul.

https://www.christianpost.com/opinion/do-i-offend-you.html


Cancel Culture: The Most Dangerous Virus Infecting the Church Today

by SHANE IDLEMAN

By now, most know what the cancel culture is: something you did in your past will be used to silence, stop, and “cancel” you. Whether it’s Mike Lindell, whose pillow company lost many retailers after he publicly questioned the election, or Goya Foods, who upset people when they thanked President Trump, the cancel culture doesn’t tolerate opposing views. So much for being “tolerant.”

Do you see the irony? The cancel culture protects Cuties on Netflix and loves Cardi B lyrics, but they can’t stand Bible verses, worship songs, or views that oppose them. Dr. Seuss is bad, Dumbo is a racist, and Speedy Gonzales offends. Granted, things from the past may need to be changed from time to time, but if you focus on children’s books and cartoon characters and say nothing against child porn, human trafficking, little kids being intentionally confused about their gender, or the killing of innocent children in the womb, you’ve lost all credibility.

The Church—Friend or Foe?

I am not especially surprised by the actions of the world; it is simply being true to its fallen nature. Rather, it’s the actions of the so-called church that are disturbing. In 2020, the cancel culture in the church became a reality for me. I was scheduled to speak at a church in Palos Verdes, California, but when the assistant pastor found out that my political views differed from his, he complained to the elders, and just like that, I was canceled—never mind the fact that my message didn’t even touch on politics. Listen to it at #1 below, and let me know if a church should cancel this type of message or if it’s exactly what we need to hear.

I received another surprise in May of 2020. I had been corresponding with Pastor Jack Hibbs about opening our church on May 31. Once we decided to open, I was shocked by how many pastors came against us. I even shared with one prominent pastor in my area how happy I was when Pastor John MacArthur and the elders at Grace Community Church also opened. To my utter dismay, he wasn’t happy at all.

By this time, the shenanigans and the agendas of many political leaders were becoming apparent (more at #2 below). We not only had a legitimate virus to deal with but we had agendas and ulterior motives working against us as well. Would churches capitulate and use Romans 13 out of context, or would they meet to fast, pray, and contend for the truth? Would they be cowards or watchmen?

Around this time, our local newspaper also canceled my articles, which had been featured for over a decade. Many liberal Christians no doubt complained and swayed the editor. Facebook also shadow banned me, causing our audience to drop from a quarter-million people per month to around ten thousand. Apparently, my views didn’t fit their narratives. They, along with YouTube, also banned my video on vaccines and immunity and removed some of my sermons. (The banned video is #3 below.)

“My View is the Right View,” So They Say

One local pastor who still hadn’t opened his church a year into COVID told me that I was actually hurting the gospel because of my views. Apparently, you’re not allowed to share solid biblical teaching if you hold beliefs that oppose liberal “Christians.” “You’re hurting the gospel with your views unless your views align with my views,” so they say.

Then in July 2020 I was hit again. We held church services at JetHawk Stadium in Lancaster, California, and it wasn’t primarily unbelievers who were complaining. Other Christians and pastors were gossiping and backbiting. It is telling that none of them seemed to be excited that over 10,000 people attended the 4-month event and we had over 150 baptisms, the majority of which were spontaneous.

Sadly, within the church, the cancel culture is often fueled by jealousy and arrogance. “They don’t think like I think, so God cannot be using them,” goes the reasoning. There have been other groups throughout the ages who behaved in similar ways—the Pharisees come to mind, as well as the pastors and denominations who have stood against many of the past revivals simply because God had the audacity to use someone else and in a way that differed from them.

So while the cancel culture is not a new thing, it is new in America, and it’s on the rise. Our nation is increasingly polarized, with people unable to have civil conversations with those who have dissimilar views, and who actually take pleasure in destroying the lives and livelihoods of those who dare to have a different opinion.

Pleasing Man Rather Than God

As I wrote last week in my article on why churches should open, all pastors relate to COVID differently depending on their perspective and circumstances. They are under tremendous pressure and need more grace, not less. I’m sure that many do much good in their communities, and for that, I applaud them. However, I don’t think cowardliness should go unchecked, for “iron sharpens iron” (Proverbs 27:17).

Let me state up front that without the Spirit of God, I’m a coward. Without deep seasons of prayer and fasting, I’m weak. Without extended times of heartfelt worship where I weep, repent, and realign my heart with Christ, I would drift from God. My heart breaks for the church, but the truth is that many Christians are being influenced by social media rather than by God’s Spirit and spend more time criticizing others rather than looking in the mirror and more time reading left-leaning liberals instead of reading and applying God’s Word. Like Samson, they do not know that the Spirit has departed (Judges 16:20).

Sadly, many pastors are joining the cancel culture, keeping their church doors locked and aligning with ungodly organizations because they have either lost the compass of truth or the boldness of the Spirit—or possibly both. They are distant from Christ, and therefore seek to be pleasers of men rather than lovers of God: “For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ” (Galatians 1:10).

They may cancel people, ideas, concepts, videos, articles, and sermons, but they can never cancel God!

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Christians respond after 6 Dr. Seuss books were ‘canceled’ for ‘hurtful’ portrayal

By Emily Wood, Christian Post Contributor

Books by Theodor Seuss Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss, including “On Beyond Zebra!” and “And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street,” are offered for loan at the Chinatown Branch of the Chicago Public Library on March 02, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois. | Getty Images/Scott Olson

As conservatives voice outrage after six Dr. Seuss books were “canceled” over insensitive imagery, a culture and policy analyst with a leading conservative Christian family organization believes Christians should acknowledge some of Seuss’ work was problematic without demonizing him.

Focus on the Family’s Jeff Johnston told The Christian Post in an interview Wednesday that Christians should be objective in their approach to “knee-jerk reaction” issues that gain so much attention.

“As Christians, we want to be temperate in issues like this, and objective and not rush to judgment about Dr. Seuss or about any of his work,” Johnston said. “And it’s also important to have some perspective on this. Dr. Seuss was a product of his own time. … Christians should be honest, too, that there are some aspects of his work that are problematic. … But at the same time, I don’t think we want to demonize Dr. Seuss.”

A 1957 photo of Theodor Geisel, best known by his pseudonym “Dr. Seuss.” | (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

In the statement released Tuesday, Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced that it made “the decision last year to cease publication and licensing” on titles such as And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry StreetIf I Ran the ZooMcElligot’s PoolOn Beyond Zebra!Scrambled Eggs Super! and The Cat’s Quizzer. The decision came after a panel of experts and educators reviewed the Dr. Seuss catalog.  

“These books portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong,” the statement reads. “Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises’s catalog represents and supports all communities and families.”

In the White House’s proclamation for “Read Across America Day,” which is on Dr. Seuss’ birthday, is traditionally associated with Seuss, the Biden administration failed to mention the author. 

The books face criticism for their portrayal of Asian and black people, according to NPR.

Johnston said it is important to recognize the context of these books and is concerned with how quickly problematic content can be erased.

“I’m a parent, and I’m also a former English teacher, so I am concerned that in some ways, it feels like we’re destroying our own history by the knee-jerk reaction to yank books and pull them out,” Johnston said. “I just think we want to be careful and rush to judgment. … We need to be careful not to demonize people, but also to use material that is problematic to teach people, especially to teach our children.”

Dr. Seuss’ stepdaughter told The New York Post that she hopes the six banned books will return to print “because his body of work is unique.” But she said she thinks the decision was “wise.”

“There wasn’t a racist bone in that man’s body — he was so acutely aware of the world around him and cared so much,’’ Lark Grey Dimond-Cates said regarding her step-dad, whose legal name was Theodor Seuss Geisel.

In Seuss’ life, Johnston said he took steps to change some of his illustrations that could be misconstrued as stereotypical. He also created cartoons against racism.

“So, we want to take a balanced approach from people of history,” Johnston said. “Like most people, he was complicated. He also produced cartoons fighting racism and anti-Semitism. … He seemed to change and grow just like most of us want to do. You can’t deny the good that he did over the years.”

Johnston also noted how in Seuss’ book about the Sneetches, he teaches to accept all, regardless of appearance. 

The decision to cease the publication of several of Seuss’ books has received backlash from Christian and conservative figures. 

Fox News’s Tucker Carlson devoted part of his Tuesday night show to discuss the Dr. Seuss news. He told viewers, “if we lose this battle, America is lost.”

Carlson also cited Seuss’ story about “Sneetches” that teaches children there is no difference between a star-bellied or plain-bellied sneetch. He described the story as a “plea for color-blindness.”

“Dr. Seuss was not a racist,” Carlson said. “He was an evangelist against bigotry. He wrote an entire shelf of books against racism, and not in a subtle way. They were clearly, explicitly, against racism. That was the whole point of writing them, to teach children not to be racist.”

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., also weighed in on the cancelation controversy and tweeted, “Now 6 Dr. Seuss books are canceled too? When history looks back at this time it will be held up as an example of a depraved sociopolitical purge driven by hysteria and lunacy.”

Retired NFL tight end and an outspoken Christian, Benjamin Watson, who has written a book about race, tweeted Wednesday that “Dr. Seuss was not just a product of his time.”

“He and others made the time what it was,” Watson wrote. “But be mature enough to celebrate and enjoy his literary work while acknowledging that parts of it that are derogatory have no place. Everyone is harmed when stereotypes are normalized.”

Some of the banned Dr. Seuss books are already selling for hundreds of dollars online.

Criticism of Dr. Seuss’ literature is nothing new. In September 2017, former first lady Melania Trump gifted a collection of 10 Dr. Seuss books to high-achieving schools across the country in honor of National Read a Book Day.

In response to the gift, an elementary school librarian in Massachusetts rejected the offer and said her school did not need the books.

In a letter posted on The Horn Book directed to the first lady, elementary school librarian Liz Phipps Soeiro wrote, “You may not be aware of this, but Dr. Seuss is a bit of a cliche, a tired and worn ambassador for children’s literature… Another fact that many people are unaware of is that Dr. Seuss’ illustrations are steeped in racist propaganda, caricatures, and harmful stereotypes.” 

The beloved children’s author, who wrote under the pseudonym, wrote over 60 books and is known for writing and illustrating bestselling literature such as The Cat in the HatOh, the Places You’ll GoGreen Eggs and Ham and How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Many of his books are now popular movies.

Johnston said with controversial issues like this, it is important for Christians to have a different approach and respond with grace in light of the Gospel.

“We do have to remember we can’t throw out good work just because some people did some bad things in their past,” Johnston shared. “I think for Christians, our message is different from the rest of the world when we encounter things that are wrong or problematic. We don’t want to be so quick to judge people, whether it’s ‘how could he write that?’ or ‘how could they cancel Dr. Seuss?.'”

“But we want to look at things objectively, and it’s always important for Christians to bring up forgiveness and grace that we have a better way of dealing with some of these problems,” he added. “We can point to the Gospel, which says that we can have reconciliation with God and with other people with Jesus Christ. … We want to point to something better.”

https://www.christianpost.com/news/6-dr-seuss-books-canceled-how-should-christians-respond.html


VIDEO Dr. Sebastian Gorka Explains How to Fight Cancel Culture: ‘You Must Not Buckle Under’

MATTHEW BOYLE 14 Feb 2021

Dr. Sebastian Gorka, a former senior aide to former President Donald Trump, explained in a wide-ranging interview last week how he has faced cancel culture, how to fight back against it, and why the left and establishment practices it against Trump supporters.

Appearing on Breitbart News Daily on SiriusXM 125 the Patriot Channel with editor-in-chief Alex Marlow, Gorka — who now hosts America First on Salem Radio Networks — laid out first the reasoning why the left and political establishment seeks to shut down voices like his.

“We could write a book about this. I don’t kiss and tell, but you’ve been on this issue from the get go. I’ve been very honest about it publicly,” Gorka told Marlow. “It’s the reason I left the White House and it was Breitbart that published my resignation letter. I told the president at the time, you literally have anti-MAGA forces in ascendance. At the time, it was H.R. McMaster and it was General Kelly who were pushing me out of the building. And I told the president, ‘There is no way I am going to pick up a $160,000 pay check from the taxpayer just to be boxed out of meetings by people who hate me and the president. I can better serve you on the outside.’ He agreed and now I have a national radio show, three million listeners, and we’re fighting the good fight. But at the end of the day, this isn’t really a function of any incompetence by the president, it’s a function of the swamp. What is the conclusion that has to be drawn from the experience of people who are pro-MAGA and work for the president? The left, the establishment, the mainstream media, the RINO class, want to make it impossible for good people to represent the forgotten men and women of America. They want to make your life impossible.”

Gorka said that he does not mind attacks against him personally, but when people attack his family, that crosses the line. He cited the example of Disney canceling Gina Carano, the star actress from The Mandalorian, over social media posts that she published commenting on the state of society and noted that similar tactics have been used against any talented people who may want to work for Trump or other effective Republicans.

“Look, I don’t mind being attacked, that’s fine, but when they come after your wife, when they attack my teenage son, it has one purpose: To make sure good people don’t get involved in representing this nation,” Gorka said. “So I’m not involved in choosing the president’s lawyers, but I’ll tell you one thing: How many law firms would actually risk representing Donald Trump? I talk national security, but I woke to this Gina Carano story. Seriously, a woman who speaks the truth — absolutely speaks the truth about the left’s attempts to dehumanize their fellow Americans — is canceled by Disney? It’s the same effect of a lawyer wanting to work for Donald Trump. It is an attempt to attack and create an environment where good people will simply keep their heads down.”

Gorka then recounted a story from his daughter’s time in college and her senior year when he worked for President Trump. “My children who are now grown will admit that the tribulations that we went through as a family during my time in the White House as a supporter of the president have truly made them stronger human beings,” Gorka said. “I am convinced as their father that their value system is all the more robust for what they witnessed happened to us and to them personally. Read the first chapter of my book The War for America’s Soul. What happened to my daughter in her last year in college was simply a function of her last name.”

What happened was leftists on campus made posters with his daughter’s face falsely claiming she was a white supremacist and then plastered them all around campus. When he showed up for her graduation that year, at least one leftist falsely accused Gorka of being a Nazi.

“So because she was a Gorka, because she volunteered to work with some of the professors who created something called the Churchill Institute to propagate the values of western civilization — that’s in their mandate — she had posters with her face put up across the campus and on social media saying this girl is the face of white supremacy,” Gorka said. “That was just weeks before her graduation. Then when I was there for the graduation, I had a girl come up after we had celebrated my daughter getting her diploma and, in front of witnesses, call me an ‘effing Nazi’ because I work for Trump.”

Gorka, who was born in London to parents who fled Hungary after the failed revolution in 1956 against Soviet control but then later served in Hungary as a Ministry of Defence adviser after the fall of communism, compared the bending of America’s will toward cancel culture to efforts of a Soviet dictator in Hungary to slowly break someone’s spine.

“This is the reality, but let me tell you a story which puts it into perspective,” Gorka said. “During the Cold War, the Warsaw Pact had various levels of persecution and sovietization. The harshest were of course the Soviet Union, East Germany, and Romania. Those were the really kind of absolute worst of the worst. Others, like Hungary, kind of dialed back a little on the Stalinist nature of the regime. By the 1970s, Hungary was called the ‘Goulash Communism.’ You weren’t allowed to go to Paris for the holidays, but you could go to Yugoslavia. You still had political prisoners, you still had a one-party state, but they just dialed it back a little bit. There’s a story that’s associated with then-dictator Janos Kadar, where somebody was lambasting him for not having a hard Stalinist line and he said — and who knows whether it happened or not — he said ‘my friend, it is far easier to bend the human spine slowly with time than to try to snap it with one move.’ That, that is what you are giving in to when you say, ‘I’m just going to get my head down, I’m just going to send checks to the local Republican candidate, but I’m not going to say anything and not going to do politics on social media.’ Guess what? You’ve already surrendered, that’s what you’ve done.”

Gorka said establishment media figures and top Democrats from President Joe Biden’s administration like Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin are doing the same thing to the general public in the United States right now.

“Look at what is happening right now in America. We have not just Jake Tapper on CNN using the phrase, ‘MAGA terrorism,’ we have the Department of Homeland Security issuing their first terrorism warning memorandum after the election targeting those who disagreed with the results of the election or who questioned them,” Gorka said. “We have the new Secretary of Defense, an absolute disgrace to the uniform he once wore, Lloyd Austin, talking about the ‘enemies’ in the ranks of the military who shut down our military for 60 days while he reviews the level of extremist penetration into our ranks. I guarantee you one thing, none of the extremists that SecDef Austin will find will be members of Antifa or BLM who took the lives of 40 people in the riots last year, half of them black like he is. This is the reality of America today and if you don’t talk out about it — you don’t have to have a national radio show, you don’t need to be editor-in-chief of the most influential conservative website. But if you’re an American and you care about the freedoms upon which it was built and for which Americans died and bled, and you don’t say the truth you are complicit and you are making the dehumanization of your fellow man all the more possible. That’s the crux of the matter.”

Hope is not all lost in America, though, Gorka said. Conservatives and Trump supporters and Americans across the board can fight back against cancel culture in much the same way he did with an example from this past week when a leftist employed at a major law firm in New York City sent him disparaging messages on Twitter.

“This Sunday, on my Twitter feed, my direct messages are open — that means anybody can direct message me if they wish to,” Gorka said. “That’s how you can keep in touch. Sunday, somebody who has a Twitter account in his own name… sent me the following messages, ‘I’m going to piss on your grave and send the photographs to your children.’ We did a little bit of research and found out who this person is and we verified where he works. He’s an accountant for one of the biggest accounting companies in New York and I proceed to message him back. I don’t say I’m going to piss on his grave, but as soon as I respond to him and I make it clear I know who he is, he blocks me from his account, he makes it private, and then he deletes it.”

Then, Gorka reached out to the man’s employer and asked about it. The CEO of the company apologized and disavowed what the man said, and apparently convened an all-hands company meeting to discuss what happened and what to do about it. Gorka said the man is no longer employed.

“I immediately dig up the email for his boss at Marcum LLP in New York and I send him the screenshots of the now-deleted account about what his employee said about me and my children and about wanting to urinate on my grave,” Gorka told Marlow. “To his credit, the CEO immediately emailed me back on a Sunday afternoon, apologized, and then on their social media accounts, they disavowed the words of Joe Wiley. I heard late last night from another follower who knows somebody who knows somebody that there was an all hands meeting at Marcum LLP on Monday morning and this individual has since been fired for his language. Now this isn’t cancel culture. Don’t get me wrong. I don’t do this to people who politically disagree with me. And I don’t tell people I politically disagree with that I want to piss on their graves and send the photographs to their children. But, if you use language like that, if you use vile, abusive language and involve my children, guess what Joe Wiley. I am going to let my voice be heard and I’m going to stand up for the truth. I know that thousands of others also went to the Marcum website and also went to their Instagram feed. That is why all of those feeds have been locked or closed. This is how you fight back — not with the dirty tactics they use because we believe in the truth. But you must not buckle under — it’s not just my voice, it’s everyone who stood for the truth the last four days. You cannot let them get away with it. You don’t have to run for public office although gosh could you imagine if every listener to your radio show decided to run for the local school board?”

Gorka also discussed the incident on his own program, here:

Gorka and Marlow concluded the conversation on cancel culture by discussing the popularity of both Trump and Breitbart News founder Andrew Breitbart. Of Trump and Breitbart, Gorka said, “there is a massive commonality between them.”

“Donald Trump, for all his mannerisms and style, never starts the fight,” Gorka said. “But if you bring the fight to him, he will finish it. He will fight back just as robustly as those who attack him. The commonality with Andrew is very simply this: Andrew, above all else, in addition to love of country, was motivated by the need, the burning sense of injustice when he witnessed bullies. What you are doing, what I am doing, what the president is doing, is fight back against those who start the abuse first. That is what all of us should be doing every single day. If you see a bully, whether it’s on the playground or on social media — I don’t care where it is — if you see one and you do nothing, I’m sorry you are part of the problem. Just stand up to the bullies and America will be a better place.”

Gorka advised Americans to put a sticky note on their desks that has the number 74 — representing the 74 million Americans who voted for Trump in 2020, to signify they are not alone — and think of that anytime they see someone getting canceled or shut down. Instead of staying silent — and being part of the problem — Gorka advises Americans to start using their voices, a powerful tool protected under the First Amendment, to fight back.

“If you do it, you will have people who say, ‘oh my gosh, he spoke the truth. So can I,’” Gorka said. “It is a catalytic effect that you have when you speak up to the bullies and liars.”

LISTEN TO DR. SEBASTIAN GORKA ON BREITBART NEWS DAILY:

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/02/14/dr-sebastian-gorka-fight-cancel-culture-not-buckle-under/


Ep. 1457 The New Rules – The Dan Bongino Show


SAUL ALINSKY’S 13 RULES FOR RADICALS

Excerpted from Saul Alinsky’s book: Rules For Radicals, published in 1971.

  1. Power is not only what you have, but what the enemy thinks you have.
    Power is derived from 2 main sources – money and people. “Have-Nots” must build power from flesh and blood.
  2. Never go outside the expertise of your people.
    It results in confusion, fear and retreat. Feeling secure adds to the backbone of anyone.
  3. Whenever possible, go outside the expertise of the enemy.
    Look for ways to increase insecurity, anxiety and uncertainty.
  4. Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.
    If the rule is that every letter gets a reply, send 30,000 letters. You can kill them with this because no one can possibly obey all of their own rules.
  5. Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon.
    There is no defense. It’s irrational. It’s infuriating. It also works as a key pressure point to force the enemy into concessions.
  6. A good tactic is one your people enjoy.
    They’ll keep doing it without urging and come back to do more. They’re doing their thing, and will even suggest better ones.
  7. A tactic that drags on too long becomes a drag.
    Don’t become old news.
  8. Keep the pressure on. Never let up.
    Keep trying new things to keep the opposition off balance. As the opposition masters one approach, hit them from the flank with something new.
  9. The threat is usually more terrifying than the thing itself.
    Imagination and ego can dream up many more consequences than any activist.
  10. “The major premise for tactics is the development of operations that will maintain a constant pressure upon the opposition.”
    It is this unceasing pressure that results in the reactions from the opposition that are essential for the success of the campaign.
  11. If you push a negative hard enough, it will push through and become a positive.
    Violence from the other side can win the public to your side because the public sympathizes with the underdog.
  12. The price of a successful attack is a constructive alternative.
    Never let the enemy score points because you’re caught without a solution to the problem.
  13. Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.
    Cut off the support network and isolate the target from sympathy. Go after people and not institutions; people hurt faster than institutions.

https://archive.org/details/RulesForRadicals

If left uncontrolled, Black Lives Matter mobs may soon target churches, religious monuments

July 08, 2020 by: Michael Alexander

(Natural News) After toppling, beheading and vandalizing the statues and icons of historical figures said to be associated with colonialism and slavery, rioters affiliated with the Black Lives Matter movement and other similar anti-establishment groups such as Antifa have moved on to new targets: churches, religious monuments and statues.

This development was first documented in Washington, D.C., where protesters, for the second time, vandalized and defaced St. John’s Episcopal Church – their way of scoring revenge against Episcopalian slave owners, according to a report by the Washington Examiner. Coincidentally, this was the same church where President Donald Trump held up a copy of the Holy Bible just minutes after dispersing a crowd with tear gas and rubber bullets.

This was followed by an incident in California, where several Native and Black protesters tore down a statue of Junipero Serra, a Spanish priest whom Pope Francis canonized as a saint back in 2015.

The toppling of the Serra statue, which San Francisco archbishop Salvatore Cordeleone described as “an act of sacrilege” and “an act of the Evil One,” has led people from different Christian communities to air fears that the attacks on Christian monuments and symbols will continue unabated.

“Statues of Jesus are next. It won’t end. Pray for the USA,” Matt Schlapp, the chairman of the American Conservative Union, said in a tweet.

Shaun King, an author, Leftist civil rights activist and a prominent figure in the Black Lives Matter movement, further fanned the flames of speculation and panic among Christian communities after tweeting that taking down statues of Jesus would be acceptable — especially if these statues and icons depict Jesus as white

“Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down,” King tweeted, adding that such depictions of Jesus are nothing more than propaganda that promotes the idea of “white supremacy.” (Related: Anti-Christian Left calls for toppling of Jesus statues.)

King failed to mention in his tweets, however, that depictions of Jesus and the saints often vary from culture to culture, with each artistic depiction taking on characteristics and visual cues from the societies it was made in.

As a response to these incidents, as well as the previous removal of Confederate statues and other historical monuments that have been deemed “racist” by radical Leftists, President Trump signed an executive order granting federal protection to public monuments and other statues of historical figures.

“They’re looking at Jesus Christ, they’re looking at George Washington, they’re looking at Abraham Lincoln, they’re looking at Thomas Jefferson,” Trump said during a meeting with Polish President Andrzej Duda in the White House’s Rose Garden, vowing to stop the toppling of monuments and statues carried out by rioters.

The order, which was signed by the President on June 27, not only mandates the prosecution of people who have been proven to have rendered damages to federal monuments, but also, the potential withholding of federal funding from state and local governments in case they fail to protect any public monument and statue within their jurisdictions.

The order, Trump said, will also be retroactive.

Anglican Church to “evaluate” and “review” list of monuments

While most Christian denominations have reacted with panic and anger over the recent incidents surrounding religious monuments and statues, some, such as the Church of England, have chosen to react in a more tempered fashion.

The Church of England, for instance, which has more than 16,000 churches and 42 cathedrals, noted that following the resurgence of the global Black Lives Matter movement and the death of George Floyd, monuments celebrating people who were involved in the “discrimination or exploitation based on race” during their lifetimes could be removed.

“We acknowledge that dialogue alone is not sufficient and must have real outcomes. These may include the alteration or removal of monuments,” Becky Clark, the church’s Director of Cathedrals and Church Buildings, said.

Justin Welby, the archbishop of Canterbury, meanwhile, said that their review of the histories of the individuals depicted in the statues and monuments will be conducted “very carefully” to assess if they should be retained in their places or not.

Clark stressed, however, that the removal or alteration of “problematic” statues and monuments must be done in a safe and legal manner, a reference to the violent dismantling of statues that happened across America and in some places in Europe within the past few weeks.

“Dialogue has to be open and honest. Churches and cathedrals are considering how they can address the issues raised by the Black Lives Matter movement and which demonstrations and direct action have brought into such sharp relief,“ Clark noted.

“Anti-Christian violence rooted in Marxist ideas”

Nathan Stone, in a column for The Federalist, stated that the current trend of anti-Christian violence and iconoclasm exhibited by rioters is rooted in Marxist thought and ideology.

“The reason for the attacks becomes clearer when considering that Black Lives Matter and Antifa are Marxist organizations and [that] Marxism is an enemy of Christianity,” Stone said, noting that atheist ideologies such as Marxism often consider transcendent religions like Christianity as “the enemy.”

“It’s why the Soviet Union was an atheistic state, which replaced God with the Communist Party,” Stone said, referring to the violent religious purges initiated by Communist leaders Vladimir Lenin, Joseph Stalin and Nikita Khrushchev.

Another reason, Stone said, for the current spate of anti-Christian violence manifesting in America, is the hatred that Marxism holds for the evils that Western Civilization has committed against the rest of the world.

Unfortunately, Marxism’s reaction to the wrongs committed by the Western world is not rooted in the latter’s reform, but rather, its total obliteration.

“Marxism assumes that because the windows are dirty and cracked, the entire house must be demolished,” Stone said, adding that if the current trend of violence against Christianity and other religions is not stopped, the United States may soon bear witness to church burnings like the ones committed during the French Reign of Terror.

Authorities decry “modern-day persecution” of Christians

Despite calls for calm and temperance, several individuals have adopted a more militant stance in response to what they say is modern-day persecution of Christians.

“If they try to cancel Christianity, if they try to force me to apologize or recant my Faith, I will not bend, I will not waver, I will not break,” Jenna Ellis, a constitutional law attorney and senior legal advisor to the Trump 2020 campaign, said in a tweet, in reference to the torture of Christian martyrs during the days of the Roman Empire.

Ordained minister and former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, meanwhile, believes the current spate of hate and violence toward religious iconography would only serve to strengthen the Christian faith.

According to Huckabee, while rioters and protesters can take down the images and art depicting Jesus, they can never take “the true spirit of Jesus Christ” out of the lives of His followers.

“Historically, under oppression and persecution, the true faith begins to show even more dramatically. It’s because in the midst of darkness, [the] light becomes more obvious,” Huckabee added.

Sources include:

TheFederalist.com

WashingtonExaminer.com

LATimes.com

MSN.com

CBSNews.com

Telegraph.com

HindustanTimes.com

LOC.gov

IWP.edu

PBS.org

FoxNews.com

https://www.naturalnews.com/2020-07-08-black-lives-matter-mobs-target-churches-religious-monuments.html