Cultivating Fresh Faith Through Your Lifetime

by Lucy Wyndham

Cultivating Fresh Faith Through Your Lifetime

Japan, Germany, and Monaco are countries approaching an aging population looking into retirement or settling in retirement homes. Among the older adults, this is probably the time to slow down, reflect, and take leisure time walking along the coast side, travel the world, or build and live in a wonderful lakeside home. The Millennials and Gen Z’s are picking up the weight and chase after the ‘American dream’ faster than ever. But, before technology became a staple in our lives, our forefathers made sure to look into the Word through meditation, mindfulness, and reflection. Looking for a fresh perspective in your walk with God? Each day provides an opportunity to an enriched life filled with a purpose.

The joy in ALL circumstances

A verse in Philippians 4 pointed, ‘Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice’. A worldview devoid of God would have only pinned joy as an event that lasts only for a moment.  But life is a struggle and it doesn’t always go your way. It’s not always happy and it’s not always on time with whatever you asked of God. True joy in your life shouldn’t be dependent on your circumstances. Once we know our Savior, Jesus Christ, we look beyond the circumstances and into the face of the one who gives us substance and meaning. This is why it’s so important to meditate on the truth and joy available to us, as this simple daily practice will help us face our struggles and change our perspective for the better.

Whose image is on you?

In the Gospel of Mark, a man once asked if ‘it is right to pay taxes to Caesar or not?’ to which Jesus replied, ‘Bring me a denarius and let me look at it… Whose image is this? And whose inscription?’ The man replied, ‘Caesar’s’ to which Jesus responded to give to Caesar what is due to his and to God which is due God’s. Ravi Zacharias, a renowned Christian apologist, made a poignant remark of the questioner’s ‘disingenuousness’ by not asking a follow-up question. If it wasn’t the case, the questioner would’ve asked, ‘What belongs to God?’ to which Jesus would have replied, ‘Whose image is on you?’. To have a calling, you first need to have a caller. Each of us is called for a holy life in Christ, to bear the image of his father, and fulfill the purpose He predestined since time immemorial.

Rethinking retirement

If you’ve never heard it before, more adults are retiring early. While there are many reasons people want to retire early, there’s an ugly truth to this ‘upside’.Adults retiring early experience loss of identity and security. The fear of the unknown may also set in once income dwindles, inflation rate shoots up, and the market crashes. Set scheduled time to reading inspirational texts to guide us in honoring our Creator and love of your neighbor. Living the faith does not come with an ‘expiration date’ and building a robust prayer life liberates you from material concerns.

Make every work matter

God cares for the world through us. Even the first task of man on earth is to ‘work and take care of’ the Garden of Eden. The Bible is replete of insinuations of God feeding His people. The only catch is that it has to be done through work. So what does this imply in your walk in the faith? From the grandest work of a CEO running a multi-billion company to washing dishes, no work is menial, and each work carries with it great dignity. As we are all parts of the body of Christ, we are called to become the ‘hands and feet’ of God.

https://godinterest.com/2019/07/10/cultivating-fresh-faith-through-your-lifetime

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Christ’s prayer for His followers, offered long ago in Jerusalem, is still His prayer for us today.

BY CHARLES F. STANLEY

Last words carry great significance because they reveal what’s important to a person. That’s why we gather around a loved one’s bed as the end draws near, hoping to hear final thoughts, instructions, or wisdom. And of all the recorded last words, the most valuable are those of the Lord Jesus. Before He went to the cross, He spent an extended evening with His disciples, celebrating the Passover. His final words in John 13-17 show us His heart for those who belong to Him.

 

Consider the roller coaster of emotions the disciples experienced in those last days and hours with their Messiah: They’d watched the crowds welcome Him into Jerusalem as “the King of Israel” just a few days before (John 12:13). But now they were gradually being awakened to the fact that things were not going to turn out as they hoped. They’d left everything to follow Him, and now Jesus was telling them He was going to die.

To see this from the disciples’ perspective, we need to better understand their expectations. According to the Old Testament prophecies, the Messiah was going to come as a conqueror to subdue Israel’s enemies, exalt the nation to global prominence, and rule over the entire world (Isa. 2:1-4). As His followers, they were anticipating places of prominence, authority, and greatness in the kingdom. They didn’t realize that they needed a Savior more than a King. The Messiah had to first offer Himself as a sacrifice in order to save His people from their sins.

 

THE LORD’S PLAN

When Jesus first began to speak of His upcoming death and resurrection, Peter actually rebuked Him, saying, “God forbid it, Lord! This shall never happen to You” (Matt. 16:22). Despite Jesus’ repeated assertions, they could not fit a dying Messiah into their belief system. But on this last night, the reality was finally sinking in, and they were filled with grief and sorrow at the thought of life without Him.

Despite Jesus’ repeated assertions, they could not fit a dying Messiah into their belief system.

Christ’s response to their trauma is best described in John’s gospel: “Having loved His own who were in the world, He loved them to the end” (John 13:1). Everything He said was for the purpose of strengthening their faith. Before their world began to turn upside down, Christ said, “I am telling you before it comes to pass, so that when it does occur, you may believe that I am He” (John 13:19). Then He revealed what was going to happen:

  • One of them would betray Him (John 13:21).
  • He was about to leave and go back to His Father, and they couldn’t follow Him (John 13:33), but He would return and take them to the Father’s house (John 14:1-3).
  • He promised that He would send them another Helper (John 14:16-18John 16:7).
  • He would still provide whatever they asked for in His name (John 14:13-14).
  • They would have a new kind of relationship with Him (John 15:1-5).
  • They would be hated and persecuted by the world but could have His peace (John 15:18-19John 16:33).

These confused and fearful men in the upper room became the foundation of the church (Eph. 2:20). Jesus was entrusting them with the task of taking His message of salvation to the world. From an earthly perspective, this looked risky. They were not an impressive group. In fact, they lacked spiritual insight and the courage to stand with Christ when their lives were in danger. Yet Jesus knew their future success didn’t depend on their own abilities but on His power, provision, and intercession. Therefore, as the evening drew to an end, the Lord lifted His eyes to heaven, and this is how He prayed:

 

These confused and fearful men in the upper room became the foundation of the church. Jesus was entrusting them with the task of taking His message of salvation to the world.

FOR HIMSELF (JOHN 17:1-5)

First, Christ prayed that both He and the Father would be glorified in His death, which would bring eternal life to all whom the Father had given Him (John 17:1-2). The cross was not a defeat, and Jesus was not a victim. By completing the work He’d been given, including His redemptive death on the cross, the Son glorified His Father.

 

FOR HIS DISCIPLES (JOHN 17:6-19)

Next, Jesus prayed—not for the world but for those who believed that God sent Him. They were precious gifts to Christ, and He had been glorified in them through their faith in Him. Now He was going to send them into the world with His message. Therefore, Jesus asked His Father to protect them from the evil one and sanctify them in the truth of His Word.

 

FOR THOSE WHO BELIEVE THROUGH THEIR WORD (JOHN 17:20-26)

In conclusion, Jesus broadened His intercession to include all future believers who would make up the body of Christ—His church. Just imagine, on that night almost 2,000 years ago Jesus prayed for you. And what did He request? “That they may all be one; even as You, Father, are in Me and I in You, that they also may be in Us, so that the world may believe that You sent Me” (John 17:21).

He wasn’t merely asking that believers get along with each other, although we should. Jesus was speaking of the spiritual unity of all Christians with the Trinity and each other. Every true believer is baptized into Christ by the Holy Spirit and becomes a part of His body. Together, we are sent to proclaim the gospel so that the world may believe.

 

THE ANSWER TO THE LORD’S PRAYER

God answered Christ’s prayer for that little band of men gathered with Him for the Passover observance. They faithfully took the gospel to the world, and we now have their testimony recorded in the Bible. What’s more, the heavenly Father continues to answer Jesus’ prayer as new Christians enter into the spiritual unity of Christ’s body. In fact, believers around the world gather to celebrate the Lord’s Supper, which Christ established that last night.

For His final request, Jesus said, “Father, I desire that they also, whom You have given Me, be with Me where I am, so that they may see My glory” (John 17:24). A day is coming when everyone Jesus prayed for will meet together in heaven with Him and with each other in perfect unity. And we can know with certainty that this will come about because the Father always answers His Son’s prayers. In the meantime, the church is called to strive toward unity here and now—loving one another just as He loves us, and testifying to an onlooking world about His transforming power.

 

Photograph by Ryan Hayslip

https://www.intouch.org/read/magazine/the-pulpit/from-the-upper-room

Epstein, Abuse, & the Log in Our Own Eye: It’s Not Just Out There

Jeffrey Epstein’s case is disturbing—and in some ways it mirrors the abuse crisis in the church.
July 15, 2019 by ED STETZER

Epstein, Abuse, & the Log in Our Own Eye: It's Not Just Out There

ust last week, news surfaced of the arrest of financier Jeffrey Epstein for running a child trafficking enterprise that allowed him to sexually abuse girls as young as 14. When federal agents searched his New York City mansion, they confiscated a “vast trove” of pictures of young girls­­.

After seeing some media reports, I tweeted this:

So, “underaged women” is not a thing. They are called children. And anyone who had sex with “underaged women” as an adult is a criminal. And, anyone who covered it up, regardless of their influence then and now, is a criminal.

As the weekend began, Labor Secretary R. Alexander Acosta announced his resignationamid continuing questions as to how he handled the sex crimes case against Epstein when Acosta was a federal prosecutor in Florida.

Every day we learn more.

The writer of Ecclesiastes says there is nothing new under the sun. For millennia, children have been victims of horrific crime. Today, children continue to be treated as objects of desire and power rather than what they are—invaluable creations of the Lord God. “What you did to the least of these, you did to me…”

It’s an admonition spoken to God’s people, but it is true for all.

When one is harmed, all suffer.

A Reminder, Again and Again

In 2012, I wrote about child abuse in a church context. In 2014 I wrote again. And in 2015 I wrote again. And we published many articles since then, many around our GC2 Summit on Sexual Harassment, Abuse, and Violence at the Billy Graham Center last November.

But, we could write on this every single day. (I sometimes get complaints that I write too much on the subject, but I think that abuse in the church is one of the defining issues of our day— and, even if it were not, every child matters.)

This systemic problem of men (and sometimes women) viewing our children as objects seems to be no nearer to an end. Perhaps this is true, but the latest indictment of Epstein reminds us that there are people fighting tirelessly on behalf of the most vulnerable and voiceless among us. They are reminding us that criminals won’t go free forever and that justice will be enacted at some point.

According to The United States Department of Justice, “Child sex trafficking refers to the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a minor for the purpose of a commercial sex act.” For reminder: a minor is anyone younger than 18 years old.

A minor is a child.

It’s easy to look at someone like Epstein, identify that he used power and influence to hide the abuse of dozens of girls, and then look for the enabler—especially when it might be someone you already have disdain for. If you hate the Clintons, you might be sure they were in on this. If you hate the Trumps, you might be sure they were in on this. All of these ideas are out there.

And, this approach makes abusers into “others out there,” when they are really in here.

First of all, if either the Clintons or the Trumps participated in or enabled Epstein’s crimes, they should face the full consequences of the law.

But, it is worth noting that the church’s impulse is to shout outrage at the American systems of wealth, politics, and justice without looking at our own issues. The sad reality is that church, too, can be a place where predators work and where the system covers up for them.

Yes, it is good to post our horror on social media. But is better to be sure our churches know how to prepare for the inevitable predator who seeks access.

It is better to be sure our churches know how to respond when accusations come forward.

It is better to know that churches stand with the victims.

After (and in addition to) this, we must fight for the justice and healing of so many who have been sexually exploited among us. We must fight against the powers and systems that have created spaces for our children to become objects for the use of others rather than persons of honor and dignity.

What More?

It is interesting that even the Confessing Church, which arose in opposition to government-sponsored efforts to unify Protestant churches into a single pro-Nazi church, later admitted their complicity in the Nazi regime:

We did fight for long years in the name of Jesus Christ against the mentality that found its awful expression in the National Sociality regime of violence; but we accuse ourselves for not standing for our beliefs more courageously, for not praying more faithfully, for not believing more joyously, and for not loving more ardently.

They did this only after a fierce admonition from Deaconness Marga Meusel and pastor and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer condemned the failure of the Confessing Church to care for the suffering Jews. Meusel’s words to the Confessing Church ring in our ears even today:

Why does the church do nothing? Why does it allow unspeakable injustice to occur? … What shall we one day answer to the question, where is thy brother Abel? The only answer that will be left to us, as well as to the Confessing Church, is the answer of Cain.

Lessons can be learned from this as well as from the Book of Esther, where we are confronted with the challenging and tireless question:

For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to your royal position for such a time as this?

What more can we do, church, when it comes to fighting for the vulnerable among us?

Four things come to mind:

First, pray without ceasing.

We must follow our King, who “always lives to make intercession for us.” Pray for those who have been victimized at the hands of others. Pray for those whose view of themselves and the world has been forever changed by the horrific acts of those they trusted. Pray for justice to be made evident, redemption to come, and for healing to overwhelm like a river of gladness.

Second, fight fearlessly.

We are called to speak on behalf of those with no voice (Prov. 31:8). Imagine a world where no wrongs are ever sought to be righted; now imagine a world where every wrong is fought to be righted. This is our purpose in life—to love God and others to the extent that we step into suffering sacrificially for the sake of another. Use your voice and your life to fight for those who have been abused.

How many of Epstein’s targets went home to tell a parent or authority figure, only to not be believed. Or, even the reporter who first wrote the story, but was not heard.

Fight for those who have been abused so they know the church is the safe place when, as in Epstein’s case, the legal system is not.

Third, prepare wisely.

Epstein targeted vulnerable children. That’s what predators do.

They target children in vulnerability. Given that churches are places of vulnerability, it is common sense that predators are targeting your church. Prepare yourself by training your church. Yes, background checks help and are a start, but we need much more. We need to educate ourselves on how to spot grooming patterns, how to set up systems where children are safe at all times, and much more.

Prepare your church as if Epstein was targeting your church’s kids—because predators are.

Fourth, love endlessly.

The great abolitionist William Wilberforce once said, “You may choose to look the other way, but you can never say again that you did not know.” Friends, it’s too late to turn the other way if we are to truly follow Christ into the hard places.

My own denomination faced some of these realities this summer, though there is more to do.

We are the hands and feet he uses to love and care for the marginalized, the bruised, the beaten. We are the ears he uses to listen to the stories and lament for the wrongs. We are the voices he uses to speak words of hope and expectation where little dwells.

Child abuse has, once again, made the news. In a sense, it has been placed at our feet. The natural inclination is to shout our anger at Epstein and to be sure to name the people we don’t like who we hope are complicit.

Yet, it is more than Epstein and his enablers. It is also about abuse in the church and its enablers as well.

The enormity of this problem, which continues to confront us, calls for a better response—one that begins on the knees in prayer and continues until justice streams down like a river and all our girls (and boys) are safe, and those who have been hurt see justice and experience healing.

Ed Stetzerholds the Billy Graham Distinguished Chair of Church, Mission, and Evangelism at Wheaton College, serves as Dean of the School of Mission, Ministry, and Leadership at Wheaton College, is executive director of the Billy Graham Center, and publishes church leadership resources through Mission Group.

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2019/july/epstein-and-log-in-our-own-eye.html

Life and Death

Eva Green

After chatting with a colleague about the state of our humanity and sexuality and lack of roles and ownership of life, I continue to be impressed with the stronghold that gangs, mafioso, cults and community groups have within their cultures..  For our generic culture in the west we are, as described on t-shirts; ‘comfortably numb’ and ‘walking dead’… There is no sense of urgency or life or abundance, only a continuation of yesterday..

The ‘stronghold’ groups have a sense of living, of being on the edge of life and death, and an understanding that they may have to pay with their life for their lifestyle.  (And also true, if they desire to leave the stronghold.)  They seem to have an understanding of roles, of urgency, of fighting for what they believe, of no compromise.  They have an identity that is beyond their own individual lives.

God has created us all to live for more.  He has set eternity in our hearts.  To be part of something bigger than ourselves.

In our western culture of independence, comfort and taking care of ‘number 1’ we are confused and weak.  We have misplaced the order of God, man, animal and creation, and now have a twisted view of order depending on what our beliefs are.  Some people would fight for animals over humans, and most of us put man (ourselves) over God as priority.

God has placed an order in creation.  Man to rule over animals and land, and to take care and be responsible.  In His church He has placed an order of Himself being head.  In the family, He has placed the man to lead.  This is not to rule over and be abusive, but to be accountable to God Himself of how he leads in love (as Christ loves His church).

We have incredibly talented people giving their lives to use their talents (which is how God intended), but unless it’s done for God it is done in vain: the devastation of a life lived fully but with nothing left standing.  Life without legacy.

Jesus says in Revelation 3.20 that He is knocking on the door and calling us, and whoever opens it to Him, He will come in and eat with them.

In my own life, I so often put Him on snooze.  I have no urgency.  He can wait….

Jesus tells us that He has come to give us life in fullness and abundance.  He promises us a FULL LIFE and not one that just continues on from yesterday, but that EACH DAY has it’s own problems but that He has supplies to cover us, in every area- practical (manna), emotional (strength), and spiritual (mercy and grace).  He is for living life fully and free; we have the whole world to use but don’t own anything.

My prayer is that we have the urgency to live for God and search out for all the fullness that He has for us and our worlds, and that we have tight and secure families and communities that show God among us with freedom.

https://pondermentslife.wordpress.com/2019/07/08/life-and-death/

I’ve Found A Great Hiding Place

by Pastor Ray Patrick

I’ve Found A Great Hiding Place

As a child, one of my favorite games was hide and seek. We looked for the best place to hide in the house or back yard, and waited quietly for our friends to try to find us. It’s a great game for kids, but as adults, we also look for a good place to hide from time to time. A place of refuge, a place of safety, or a place to rest when we feel overwhelmed by the circumstances of life, a place where the enemy of our soul can never find us.

I’ve got good news. God has the perfect hiding place for you! You don’t have to hide at work. You don’t have to hide in relationships. You don’t have to hide in food or addictions, because God Himself promises to hide you! He freely offers you shelter from the storms of life, any time you call upon His name.

Today, remember there’s only one place the enemy cannot find you. There’s only one place where opposition cannot steal from you. There’s only one true place of safety and rest for your soul, and that is in the arms of Jesus. Know that He loves you, and He is ready to receive you when you call upon His name! Hallelujah!

“In the day of trouble He will keep me safe in His dwelling; He will hide me in the shelter of His sacred tent and set me high upon a rock.”

(Psalm 27:5, NIV)

Pray With Me
Yahweh, today I come humbly before You giving You all of me. Father, thank You for hiding me in Your shelter and keeping me safe from the storms of life. God, today my soul finds rest in You, please hide me from the enemy of my soul, as I seek You and praise Your Holy Name, in Jesus’ Name! Amen.

https://godinterest.com/2019/07/10/ive-found-a-great-hiding-place/?

Will Amazon Ban The Bible Next?

Michael Brown: Site crossed a very dangerous line removing psychologist’s books

 

In a very disturbing move, Amazon has removed the books of Dr. Joseph Nicolosi, the psychologist whom critics have dubbed “the father of conversion therapy.” In other words, for claiming that sexual orientation is not innate and immutable, and for claiming that change is possible, Dr. Nicolosi’s books must be banned.

This leads to the logical question: Will Amazon ban the Bible next? There is no hyperbole here.

After all, it is the Bible that condemns same-sex relationships and the Bible that speaks of those who once practiced homosexuality but do so no more (see 1 Corinthians 6:9-11). These people, today, would be known as “ex-gays.” And it was Dr. Nicolosi’s life work to help people with unwanted same-sex attractions.

Why, then, should Amazon ban his books but continue to sell the Bible, which provides the theological underpinnings for Dr. Nicolosi’s scientific work?

After all, gay critics of the Bible refer to the so-called “clobber passages,” referring to verses that have been used to speak against homosexual practice. If these verses, then, have brought such harm to the gay community, why shouldn’t the book containing these verses be banned?

Not only so, but there are numerous books on Amazon written by ex-gays, sharing their wonderful stories of transformation. Will their books be banned next?

And what about the books that come to different scientific conclusions than the LGBT activists and their allies? And the books that challenge the goals of LGBT activism in society? And the books that reiterate the Scriptural prohibition of same-sex relationships?

Will those books be banned next?

What makes this especially frightening is that it appears that one man, Rojo Alan, based in England, was responsible for getting the books removed.

As reported on Pink News, at first, after sharing his concerns in writing, he got no response from either Amazon or the British outlet, Wordery. But after he posted his concerns on Facebook, he got an immediate response from Wordery, which quickly pulled Nicolosi’s writings.

Amazon, however, claimed that the books did not violate their guidelines.

Alan explains that “since then, I had been working on getting these books pulled. I contacted Amazon regularly to speak to them about the books, about how unethical they are.”

He “used social-media sites to ask people to leave bad reviews of the books, and also began researching the ways in which they violated Amazon’s rules of publishing.”

And, he continues, “Once I gathered everything I went back to Amazon and I threw all the information I had at them in several conversations. Yet I was given the same ‘we will refer this to the relevant team.’”

Not long after this, the books were removed, and Alan was moved to tears.

Of course, I could produce scores of testimonies from former patients of Dr. Nicolosi who were greatly helped by his counsel. Some experienced profound changes in their attractions. Others were freed from shame and self-harm. That’s why he remained in demand until his sudden passing in 2017.

Why don’t these voices matter?

I could also produce literature from liberal psychologists like the lesbian activist Dr. Lisa Diamond, who argues strongly that sexual orientation is fluid.

But that is not the real issue here. The issue is one of banning books that violate certain guidelines, in this case, guidelines created by LGBT activists. Amazon is now playing a very dangerous game of censoring that which is not politically correct. Where will that lead next?

Amazon carries thousands of books (perhaps, several hundred thousand books) that many readers find harmful and distasteful. Amazon carries a staggering array of material that offends many buyers or that raises serious concerns among others.

There are books that encourage behaviors I believe are destructive. There are books and other materials that attack and mock ideologies that are sacred to me. Should Amazon ban these books too?

Should Amazon ban books encouraging atheism and mocking the Bible? Or, conversely, should Amazon ban books challenging Darwinian evolution?

Should Amazon ban books that encourage sexual experimentation and the casting off of conservative morals? Or, conversely, should Amazon ban books that decry the dangers of legalized marijuana?

Should Amazon ban books that lead people into religious cults? Or, conversely, should it ban books that help people get out of these cults?

Should Amazon ban books that provide unhealthy food recipes? Or, conversely, should it ban books that encourage healthy eating and potentially “fat-shame” people?

To repeat: Amazon has crossed a very dangerous, precarious line. It needs to make an immediate about-face, admit its error, and make Dr. Nicolosi’s books available again.

The readers can decide what to buy and what not to buy.

It’s one thing if a book encouraged illegal, life-threatening behavior, as in a terrorist’s manual for making a bomb.

It’s another thing when a book, written by a respected psychologist, is banned because it violates LGBT sensibilities. Is this also a fruit of Amazon working with the notoriously left-leaning SPLC?

I have been a long-term Amazon customer, purchasing tens of thousands of dollars of books from them over the years, along with everything ranging from computers to headphones to random household items. As an author, I also recognize the importance of selling books on Amazon and getting good reviews written. And for me, personally, Amazon’s customer service has been second to none.

All the more, then, do I appeal to Amazon: Please set this right.

We know Jeff Bezos supports the LGBT cause, and that’s his prerogative. But when political leanings influence censorship decisions, we move a step closer to burning books in the streets.

Amazon, please reverse your course.

(If you agree with this article, post and share it widely, sharing your concerns with Amazon as well.)

https://www.wnd.com/2019/07/will-amazon-ban-the-bible-next/

Why Do The Heathen Rage?

Joseph Farah explains why it’s irrational not to walk with God

Editor’s note: WND founder and CEO Joseph Farah is recovering from a serious stroke. He appreciates the prayers and best wishes of so many WND readers.

The following column is adapted from Farah’s latest book, “The Gospel in Every Book of the Old Testament” – now back in print and available in hardcover.

Imagine a vain thing? That’s what mortals do when they conspire against God, with or without the aid of demons. They did it in Noah’s day. They did in at the Tower of Babel. The results were not favorable for the rebels.

But one thing the Bible demonstrates so clearly for us is that each new generation resorts to rebellion. It has always been that way. We can see it in our own world today. All we have to do is hang around and live long enough.

Ecclesiastes 1:9 tells us this truth: “The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.”

It’s true of all manner of rebellions, too. There’s no new form of rebellion under the sun. The evil men do today is no worse than the evil they did in Noah’s day, prompting God to destroy all life save one family.

We can’t save ourselves with a carbon tax or by banning air travel or by eradicating plastic straws.

That’s why God tells us in Isaiah 1:18: “Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red as crimson, they shall be as wool.”

What do we need to do? “Be willing and obedient,” He says. Just return to Him and His ways.

There isn’t any sin you can commit that hasn’t been committed – or forgiven.

“But if ye refuse and rebel, ye shall be devoured with the sword: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it,” Isaiah 1:20 says.

I’ve been meditating on Psalm 2. There’s so much wisdom there.

“Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?” asks the psalmist. “The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed, saying, Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us. He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision. Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure. Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. I will declare the decree: the Lord hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel. Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.”

God is speaking to us still today in this generation with the same message He has always had for us throughout the eons.

Trust in Him – and His Son.

There is no other way – no other prudent path, no other road that leads to life.

He commands: “Let’s reason together.” It’s irrational not to walk with God. How many times must we see the folly of the way of the heathen? Why do the heathen still rage against Him? Why do they imagine a vain thing – that there is life in the way of rebellion against God Almighty?Top of Form

https://www.wnd.com/2019/07/why-do-the-heathen-rage/