200 GOP congressmen slam Democrats, say they’ll never vote for tax-funded abortions

Radical liberals, led by flip-flopper Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, want to repeal the Hyde Amendment and fund abortion worldwide.

Wed Jan 27, 2021

By David McLoone

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 27, 2021 (LifeSiteNews) – Two hundred Republican Congressmen vowed in a letter addressed to U.S. House and Senate leadership their “unified opposition to Congressional Democrats’ efforts to repeal the Hyde Amendment and other current-law, pro-life appropriations provisions.”

The Hyde Amendment prohibits the use of most federal funds for abortions, except in some limited circumstances. Although Joe Biden was originally in favor of the Hyde Amendment, even as recently as 2019, he has dramatically altered his position to align with the Democratic Party platform, which has promised to repeal the amendment throughout the 2020 presidential campaign and, indeed, since taking the presidency. The Democrats officially support unlimited abortion on demand, funded by taxpayers. Biden and Kamala Harris marked the anniversary of Roe v. Wade by pledging to make abortion available to “everyone.”

The letter noted that Biden flip-flopped on the issue of tax-funded abortions “(as) recent as June 2019,” until which time he “supported the Hyde Amendment and acknowledged that it works harmoniously with federal funding for women’s health care.”

Biden justified his change of heart by saying, “If I believe health care is a right, as I do, I can no longer support an amendment that makes that right dependent on someone’s zip code.”

The 200 signatories taking a stand against the Democrats and supporting the amendment, on the other hand, have the support of the public. “Polling indicates that repealing the Hyde Amendment is opposed by most of the American public.” They added that “Congressional Democrats now seek to further erode public trust in government by ignoring mainstream public opinion in favor of placating the radical Left.”

“Repealing these pro-life provisions would destroy nearly half a century of bipartisan consensus,” the letter read. “Each year since 1976, Congress has included Hyde protections in annually enacted appropriations. No president in American history has ever vetoed an appropriations bill due to its inclusion of the Hyde Amendment.”

Appealing to the great benefit of maintaining the legislation, the Republican Study Committee, responsible for the letter, wrote that the “Hyde Amendment alone has saved the lives of over 2 million innocent babies and continues to protect the conscience rights of a vast majority of Americans opposed to publicly funded abortions.”

As a result, the signatories say they “cannot allow the Hyde Amendment and other important pro-life safeguards to be decimated by Congressional Democrats. Accordingly, we pledge to vote against any government funding bill that eliminates or weakens the Hyde Amendment or other current-law, pro-life appropriations provisions.”

Rep. Jim Banks, R-Indiana, chairman of the committee, pointed the finger directly at Democrats in a statement, claiming that they have turned their backs on conscientious Americans who oppose the use of their taxes for funding abortions.

“Despite decades of consensus on this issue, radical Democrats have signaled they no longer have an interest in protecting the conscience rights of millions of Americans who do not want their hard-earned money used to pay for abortions. My colleagues and I demand congressional leaders protect the ban on taxpayer-funded abortions and save the Hyde Amendment.”

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/200-gop-congressmen-slam-democrats-say-theyll-never-vote-for-tax-funded-abortions

First Prayer in Congress, September 1774

by Bill Federer

 

“The Establishment Clause must be interpreted by reference to historical practices”-Supreme Court, Galloway

“It was enough to melt a heart of stone,” remarked John Adams after the First Prayer in Congress.

The First Session of the First Continental Congress opened in September of 1774 with a prayer in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia.

America was being threatened by the most powerful monarch in the world, Britain’s King George III.

On September 7, 1774, as the Congress began, the founding fathers listened to Rev. Jacob Duche’ read Psalm 35, which was the “Psalter” for the day according to the Anglican Book of Common Prayer:

“Plead my cause, Oh, Lord, with them that strive with me, fight against them that fight against me. Take hold of buckler and shield, and rise up for my help.

Draw also the spear and the battle-axe to meet those who pursue me; Say to my soul, ‘I am your salvation.’

Let those be ashamed and dishonored who seek my life; Let those be turned back and humiliated who devise evil against me.”

Then Rev. Jacob Duche’ prayed:

“Be Thou present, O God of Wisdom, and direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly; enable them to settle all things on the best and surest foundations; that the scene of blood may be speedily closed;

that Order, Harmony and Peace may be effectually restored, and that Truth and Justice, Religion and Piety, prevail and flourish among the people …

Preserve the health of their bodies, and the vigor of their minds, shower down on them, and the millions they here represent, such temporal Blessings as Thou seest expedient for them in this world, and crown them with everlasting Glory in the world to come.

All this we ask in the name and through the merits of Jesus Christ, Thy Son and our Saviour, Amen.”

That same day, September 7, 1774, John Adams wrote to his wife, Abigail, describing the prayer:

“When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made a motion that it should be opened with Prayer.

It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York, and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina because we were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship …”

John Adams continued:

“Mr. Samuel Adams arose and said that he was no bigot, and could hear a Prayer from any gentleman of Piety and virtue, who was at the same time a friend to his Country.

He was a stranger in Philadelphia, but had heard that Mr. Duche’ deserved that character and therefore he moved that Mr. Duche’, an Episcopal clergyman might be desired to read Prayers to Congress tomorrow morning.

The motion was seconded, and passed in the affirmative. Mr. Randolph, our president, vailed on Mr. Duche’, and received for answer, that if his health would permit, he certainly would …”

Adams continued:

“Accordingly, next morning Reverend Mr. Duche’ appeared with his clerk and in his pontificals, and read several prayers in the established form, and read the collect for the seventh day of September, which was the thirty-fifth Psalm.

You must remember, this was the next morning after we heard the horrible rumor of the cannonade of Boston.

I never saw a greater effect upon an audience.

It seemed as if heaven had ordained that Psalm to be read on that morning …

After this, Mr. Duche’, unexpectedly to every body, struck out into an extemporary prayer, which filled the bosom of every man present.

I must confess, I never heard a better prayer, or one so well pronounced.

Episcopalian as he is, Dr. Cooper himself never prayed with such fervor, such ardor, such earnestness and pathos, and in language so elegant and sublime, for America, for the Congress, for the province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially the town of Boston.

It has had an excellent effect upon everybody here. I must beg you to read that Psalm.”

The Library of Congress printed a historical placard of Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia, which stated:

“Washington was kneeling there with Henry, Randolph, Rutledge, Lee, and Jay, and by their side there stood, bowed in reverence the Puritan Patriots of New England …

‘It was enough’ says Mr. Adams, ‘to melt a heart of stone. I saw the tears gush into the eyes of the old, grave, pacific Quakers of Philadelphia.'”

The Journals of Congress then recorded their appreciation to Rev. Mr. Duche’:

“Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 7, 1774, 9 o’clock a.m. Agreeable to the resolve of yesterday, the meeting was opened with prayers by the Rev. Mr. Duche’.

Voted, That the thanks of Congress be given to Mr. Duche’ … for performing divine Service, and for the excellent prayer, which he composed and delivered on the occasion.”

In the Supreme Court case of Town of Greece, NY, v. Galloway et al, Justice Kennedy wrote in the decision, May 5, 2014:

“Government may not mandate a civic religion that stifles any but the most generic reference to the sacred any more than it may prescribe a religious orthodoxy …

The first prayer delivered to the Continental Congress by the Rev. Jacob Duché on Sept. 7, 1774, provides an example: ‘…All this we ask in the name and through the merits of Jesus Christ, Thy Son and our Saviour, Amen’ … (W. Federer, America’s God and Country 137, 2000).

From the earliest days of the Nation, these invocations have been addressed to assemblies …

Our tradition assumes that adult citizens … can tolerate and perhaps appreciate a ceremonial prayer delivered by a person of a different faith.”

Town of Greece v. Galloway was cited by the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals in upholding “In God We Trust” on national currency, August 28, 2018:

“In Galloway, the Supreme Court offered an unequivocal directive: ‘The Establishment Clause must be interpreted by reference to historical practices and understandings’ …

Historical practices often reveal what the Establishment Clause was originally understood to permit …

Historical practices confirm that the Establishment Clause does not require courts to purge the Government of all religious reflection or to ‘evince a hostility to religion by disabling the government from in some ways recognizing our religious heritage’ …”

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the atheist plaintiffs’ effort to get “In God We Trust” removed from U.S. currency:

“We recognize that convenience may lead some Plaintiffs to carry cash, but nothing compels them to assert their trust in God …

The core of the Plaintiffs’ argument is that they are continually confronted with ‘what they feel is an offensive religious message.’

But Galloway makes clear that ‘offense … does not equate to coercion.'”

Ten months after the First Prayer in Congress, Rev. Jacob Duche’ exhorted Philadelphia’s soldiers, July 7, 1775:

“Considering myself under the twofold character of a minister of Jesus Christ, and a fellow-citizen … involved in the same public calamity with yourselves …

addressing myself to you as freemen … ‘Stand fast, therefore, in the liberty, wherewith Christ hath made us free’ (Galatians, ch. 5).”

https://newsmaven.io/americanminute/american-history/first-prayer-in-congress-september-1774-tT9nDK95PkeUtEVyPkNjyQ/

Supremes Turn Back Atheist’s Demands Again

Man has been seeking to remove mention of Almighty for decades

 

in_god_we_trust

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday turned back – again – a demand from an atheist who insists on removing any reference to “God” from the discourse of government.

There are references to a deity on money – the motto “In God We Trust” – and in the Pledge of Allegiance, as well as in other scenarios.

Michael Newdow, who has lost other, similar, cases at the high court already, was unsuccessful again when on Monday the justices declined to take up Newdow’s latest fight.

He was targeting the inscription “In God We Trust” on coins and currency.

The Washington Examiner reported Newdow, “an activist who filed the case on behalf of a group of atheists,” claimed that the instructions from Congress to the Treasury Department to include the words violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

That prevents Congress from setting up a national church.

The words first appeared on coins in 1864 and in 1955 Congress decided to have it on all coins and currency.

Newdow’s claim had stated that the government was turning atheists into “political outsiders” with the decision.

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals had similarly rejected his claim last year.

Besides “In God We Trust,” and “Under God” in the Pledge, he’s also demanded that high government officials such as Supreme Court justices and presidents be censored from stating “So help me God,” when they affirm an oath to uphold the Constitution.

WND has reported on his fight against references to “God” for nearly two decades.

When the 6th Circuit threw out his case last year, it ruled the motto doesn’t burden atheists’ free exercise, nor does it impact their free pssech.

“The court ruled that the national motto is a symbol of common national identity and did not discriminate against or suppress plaintiffs’ beliefs,” the American Center for Law and Justice said at that time.

The court had said, “Because plaintiffs do not allege that the motto is attributed to them and because the Supreme Court has reasoned that currency is not ‘readily associated with’ its temporary carrier, the district court properly dismissed plaintiffs’ Free Speech claim.”

Newdow’s claim was that “the mere presence of the national motto on currency violates their Free Speech and Free Exercise Clause rights. The atheists asserted that carrying currency equated to governmental compulsion to speak in support of the national motto and to bear a ‘religiously offensive’ message, in violation of the Free Exercise Clause and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).”

“Every court that has considered any challenge to the national motto has rejected it. When we filed our amicus brief, we let the court know we were representing over 315,000 supporters who signed on to our Committee to Defend ‘In God We Trust’ – Our National Motto – on Our Currency,” ACLJ said.

 

https://www.wnd.com/2019/06/supremes-turn-back-atheists-demands-again/

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