VIDEO ‘God Turned Off Our Megachurch’s Power — So We Could Witness His Power’

By Jesse T. Jackson -June 8, 2021

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Pastor Robby Gallaty of Long Hollow Baptist Church in Tennessee posted Sunday on his Facebook page a testimony of how God worked in spite of a full-blown power outage that took place during their 11:15 AM service this past Sunday.

“We just encountered something I haven’t experienced before at Long Hollow or at any church for that matter,” Gallaty explained. He said the event happened while he was preaching on 2 Corinthians 3:17-18, where Paul tells the Corinthian church: “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. We now with unveiled faces are looking at the glory of God are being transformed.”

Gallaty said halfway through his sermon, all the power went out. “The back-up lights continued to work for 15 minutes. Unbeknownst to us, the transformer caught on fire, and blew out at the substation right when I was ending my sermon. We heard a loud bang, and then, boom! We were sitting in pitch-black darkness.”

Having never been faced with this type of scenario before, the pastor said most people took out their cell phones and turned on their flashlights, lighting the room. Gallaty considered ending the service, thinking, The power is out, my TV is out, my mic is out, the worship team can’t play their instruments, so I’ll just close the service in prayer.

‘The Enemy Will Not Get the Victory’

As the pastor prepared to say, “Let me pray as we close the service,” Gallaty said something stopped him. Instead, he said, “We are not going to let the enemy get the victory today.” Gallaty said he listened to the Holy Spirit’s prompting and changed course. “What happened next was unreal,” he said.

Because the there was no electricity, the only power was the sound of his voice, so he began yelling so everyone in the auditorium could hear him. Gallaty invited anyone in the congregation to come forward who needed to be set free from addiction, resentment, bitterness, shame, guilt, porn, drugs, pride, or any other sin that might have a foothold in his or her life.

“There was a palpable presence of God,” Gallaty said, as he knelt to pray. The pastor began to uncontrollably weep as many in the audience also came forward to the altar and began to weep.

The powerful service ended without a trace of electricity and only an acoustic guitar and the voices of God’s people filing the room singing “Death Was Arrested.” “It felt like a Book of Acts service,” said Gallaty. “No lights, no frills, no electric instruments, no show; just the people of God and the power of the Holy Spirit.”

Gallaty told ChurchLeaders.com, “I don’t think it’s any accident that while I was preaching the final sermon of the Holy Spirit series, during the final service, on the second to last line of the message, the Spirit manifested His presence. He definitely left a lasting impression on all of our minds.”

One Question, Four Answers

WHICH MOMENT OF JESUS’ LAST WEEK ON EARTH SPEAKS TO YOU THE MOST?

 

Mark 15:16-19 carefully details the mockery that Christ endured at the hands of a battalion of about 500 Roman soldiers inside the Praetorium. After He was falsely accused of leading an insurrection, the soldiers taunted Jesus by putting a twisted crown of thorns upon His head, wrapping a purple robe on His bloody body, placing a fake scepter in His trembling hands, and saluting Him with sadistic glee. Through enduring these various forms of abuse, Jesus as our high priest took upon Himself the shame of innocent victims living in a fallen world. Victims of verbal, emotional, sexual, and physical abuse need to know Christ as not only a guilt-bearing Savior but also a shame-bearing Savior—one who identifies, empathizes, and heals.

—Mika Edmondson, pastor of New City Fellowship in Grand Rapids, Michigan and author of The Power of Unearned Suffering: The Roots and Implications of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Theodicy

 

Jesus’ prayer in Gethsemane—“Not as I will, but as You will” (Matt. 26:39)—is one I think about often, as it reveals much about the nature of prayer. When we pray, we are not asking God to magically do things we want, but rather we enter God’s presence and ask that our hearts and minds be transformed. We’re tempted to see problems in the world as out there, in other people; it’s much harder to recognize the darkness, greed, hate, lust, and anger in our own heart. In prayer, we follow Jesus in asking for our own transformation—not to make us better people, but to make ourselves available to embody God’s love and compassion in the world.

—C. Christopher Smith, editor of The Englewood Review of Books and author of How the Body of Christ Talks: Recovering the Practice of Conversation in the Church

 

After all Jesus went through His last week on earth, He could have said “OK, Father, I’m done with them.” But that’s not who Jesus is. I find it moving that He took the time to come back to the disciples a second time after His resurrection—and in particular that He decided to give Thomas a chance to touch His wounds and believe. He could have been “done” with Thomas, but He proved Himself again. He did that so there would be a record of it for people like me. I appreciate that about Jesus. He knows us, and He loves us still. His love is never done.

—TaRanda Greene, member of Cana’s Voice and solo vocal artist. Her latest album is The Healing.

 

I can’t imagine being at the table with Jesus in the upper room. After He took the cup and bread, giving thanks, He said six words I can’t shake: “Do this in remembrance of Me” (Luke 22:19). I kind of think of communion now as part of a progressive dinner party that began in the upper room and ends in the Wedding Feast of the Lamb. We attend the same meal those disciples did; we’re just down the street a little. Believers who come after us attend the same meal, but it’s held at another house. The body and the blood is timeless, and believers get to be there for the finale in heaven. We remember every time, but He remembers as well. It’s His covenant with us, and I can’t wait to find place settings with my name and yours at the ultimate Easter banquet.

—Sarah Harmeyer, speaker and founder of Neighbor’s Table

https://www.intouch.org/read/magazine/faith-works/one-question-four-answers-holy-week