VIDEO NC Lt. Governor Mark Robinson: Critical Race Theory Mirrors Teachings Of The KKK

By Mike LaChance June 1, 2021

North Carolina Lt. Governor Mark Robinson was recently interviewed on Newsmax and spoke about the far left concept of Critical Race Theory being pushed in many American schools.

Robinson suggested that Critical Race Theory has much in common with the teachings of the KKK, and he is right.

Critical Race Theory teaches that a person’s skin color is the most important thing about them.

From Newsmax:

NC Lt. Gov. Robinson to Newsmax: Critical Race Theory Mirrors Ku Klux Klan

North Carolina Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson compared critical race theory to the ideology of the Ku Klux Klan on Newsmax on Friday, saying they ”mirror each other.”

The 52-year-old Republican, the first Black person to hold the office of lieutenant governor in North Carolina, derided critical race theory, which the Encyclopedia Britannica defines as the belief that race is a socially constructed category ingrained in law intended to maintain social, economic, and political inequalities between whites and nonwhites. It holds that the U.S. society is inherently racist.

”It is absolutely insidious,” Robinson said on ”Greg Kelly Reports.” ”What’s happening here, you go and take critical race theory is that is applied down and … then take some of the ideologies that were pushed by groups like the Ku Klux Klan and other hate groups, you can almost set them on top of each other, and they mirror each other in the way that they divide and the way they demonize people by race.”

Robinson, a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserve and a native of North Carolina — the ninth of 10 children — in November was voted to the second highest elected position in the state. He also derided Black Lives Matter, saying its name is a complete misnomer.

Watch the video below:

Robinson is a rising star in the Republican party, and this is why.

The man speaks the truth.

Cross posted from American Lookout.



Related

Former NFL Player Jack Brewer Wants to Restore God Discipline to Schools

By Stephanie Martin -May 6, 2021

Jack Brewer

To tackle inequality, racial division and anti-police sentiments, former NFL player Jack Brewer is launching the Serving Institute, a faith-based program he says will return the much-needed “fear of God” and “fear of authority” to America’s classrooms.

Brewer, who’s been fighting global poverty through his foundation since 2006, also worked with the Police Athletic League in response to NFL players’ national anthem protests. After noticing that relations between the Black community and police “didn’t necessarily get better,” he began teaching pro athletes and prison inmates. Brewer realized that “access to education” is a key factor in “keeping us divided.”

Jack Brewer Addresses ‘Crazy Educational Gap’

In an interview with The Daily Wire, Jack Brewer explains that the Serving Institute is partnering with Liberty University on a faith-based curriculum for use in private schools. Programs for value-building, etiquette, grammar, sports, assessments, and interventions also are included.

Brewer is excited to “actually start doing something about this crazy educational gap [in America] that’s leaving these inner-city kids’ reading and math proficiency levels lower than third-world countries,” he says. During the summer months, students will do extra work to boost their scores.

Because another goal of the institute is to create “servant leaders,” students will be required to conduct community service—“even if they themselves are less fortunate.” Brewer says, “We’re going to…teach them that through service, they can also empower themselves while they’re empowering their communities.”

Students Need Accountability, Says Jack Brewer

Faith is vital to the Servant Institute, Brewer says, because “we’ve got to get God back in our schools. I’m a believer in that. And most importantly, we’ve got to get discipline back in our schools because when you’re raised in discipline, then you demand discipline from other people as well.”

Of the U.S. educational system, Brewer says, “We’ve gotten so free. When they pulled the paddles out of the schools in the mid-’80s, that’s where this all started. I say it all the time, some kids need the paddle. They need that, that fear of authority being able to tell them what’s right or wrong. That’s why you see people disrespecting cops like they do now.”

Disrespect won’t “go down in my school,” says Brewer. “I can’t paddle [students], but I’m going to do everything except for that. If you do anything that’s disrespectful…I will physically exert you as your punishment so you understand that you have to be held accountable. We need the fear of God back in our schools, and we need our parents to start being parents again and not friends.”

Brewer, a supporter of former President Trump, spoke at the Republican National Convention last August. Recalling his father standing up against a KKK rally in Texas, he said, “I know what racism looks like. I’ve seen it firsthand in America. It has no resemblance to President Trump.”

The former athlete added that he’s “fed up” with portrayals of the 45th president, saying the media “refuse to acknowledge what he’s actually done in the Black community. It’s confusing the minds of our innocent children.”

COMMENT:

I participated in prayer in school and remember when the Untied States Supreme Court kicked God out of school. We need to let God back in school and everywhere else.

Redemption: Here’s how the 1st KKK grand wizard came to love black people

by Elizabeth Stauffer, The Western Journal October 10, 2020

They are rare.

They may happen once in a lifetime or not at all. They’re God stories, moments of clarity — those occasions when an individual experiences a profound spiritual change. And suddenly, a long-held, deeply ingrained attitude or behavior vanishes and nothing is the same again.

Confederate Army Gen. Nathaniel Bedford Forrest, who earned the nickname “The Wizard of the Saddle” for his aggressive — and highly effective — exploits on the battlefield, and subsequently served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, underwent such a fundamental transformation.

Forrest was born in 1821 in Chapel Hill, Tennessee, the eldest son of a poor blacksmith and his wife. Upon the death of his father 16 years later, Forrest became the man of the house.

A born leader, he seemed to rise to a position of authority in whatever enterprise he was associated with.

Last month, writer David Cloud shared several anecdotes from Forrest’s early life that demonstrate the extremity of his personality.

When his deeply religious mother, whom he loved, was attacked by a cougar, “he got his gun and his hunting dogs, tracked down the beast, treed it, killed it, and cut off its ears to present to his mother as a trophy of revenge,” Cloud wrote in a heavily researched piece for Way of Life Literature, which publishes Bible Study material.

Cloud recounted that Forrest got his start in business with one of his uncles. When he was 24, four brothers “who were seeking payment for a debt” attacked his uncle.

Forrest “shot two of them with a gun and stabbed two with a knife, and only one survived,” he wrote.

According to Cloud, by the time the Civil War broke out in 1861, Forrest had already become one of Tennessee’s richest men. He had earned his fortune through various business ventures, including the ownership of two cotton plantations and a thriving slave trading business.

Due to what Cloud called “his genius as a [cavalry] commander,” Forrest rose through the ranks rapidly. His audacity and his successes were legendary.

Cloud wrote that Forrest “killed 31 men during the war in hand-to-hand combat, had 30 horses shot out from under him, and was wounded four times. In one engagement, he fought four men at once and managed to escape. His brilliant tactics enabled him to defeat the larger Union forces repeatedly. General William Tecumseh Sherman named him ‘that devil Forrest’ and called for his death ‘even if it takes 10,000 men and bankrupts the Federal treasury.’

“His battlefield tactics have been studied in war colleges.”

History.com biography of Forrest described the most heinous act that occurred under his command. Following their capture of a Union garrison during the Battle of Fort Pillow in April 1864, Forrest’s men are alleged to have killed 200 soldiers after they had surrendered. A large number of them were black.

Cloud wrote that although “the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) was formed in 1865 … it didn’t prosper until 1867” when it Forrest became its leader.

The KKK, presided over by its new grand wizard, was very active during the 1868 presidential election, and was ultimately responsible for many political assassinations.

“During the election campaign of 1868, there were 336 murders or attempted murders of blacks in Georgia alone to suppress Republican voting,” Cloud wrote.

According to Cloud, Forrest attended and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in New York City that year. His friend was the Democratic vice presidential nominee, and the party’s campaign slogan was: “Our Ticket, Our Motto, This Is a White Man’s Country; Let White Men Rule.”

The following year, “Forrest left the KKK … and tried unsuccessfully to disband it,” Cloud wrote.

However, it would still be another six years before he would accept Jesus Christ.

In the fall of 1875, while attending a sermon with his wife, a devout Christian, he was especially moved by the words of Jesus in Matthew 7:24-27:

“Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock,” Jesus says in the passage.

“But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.”

In a paper titled “When the Devil Got Saved: The Christian Conversion of Nathan Bedford Forrest,” (a summary of his long-form biography titled “Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Redemption”), biographer Shane Kaster wrote that following the sermon, Forrest spoke to the pastor.

He reportedly said: “Sir, your sermon has removed the last prop from under me. I am the fool that built on the sand; I am a poor miserable sinner.”

The pastor “told Forrest to go home and read and meditate on Psalm 51 and see where it led him,” Kaster wrote.

Psalm 51:1-3, reads: “Have mercy on me, O God, according to your unfailing love; according to your great compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash away all my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin. For I know my transgressions, and my sin is always before me.”

Kaster wrote that the next night, Forrest knelt with the pastor and accepted Jesus Christ as his Lord and savior.

Shortly after his conversion, Forrest spoke before the Pole-Bearers Association, a black civil rights group.

“I came to meet you as friends, and welcome you to the white people. I want you to come nearer to us,” he reportedly said. “When I can serve you I will do so. We have but one flag, one country; let us stand together. We may differ in color, but not in sentiment.”

“Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I’ll come to your relief. I thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for this opportunity you have afforded me to be with you, and to assure you that I am with you in heart and in hand.”

Following his speech, a young black girl reportedly presented him with a bouquet of flowers, and he responded by kissing her on the cheek.

Two years later, Forrest died at the age of 56, a changed man.

As Forrest lay dying, he reportedly told loved ones there was “not a cloud that separated him from his beloved Heavenly Father.”

This story demonstrates the power of Jesus to transform lives.

Skeptics may scoff at the notion that a divine power can intervene in an individual’s life and bring such radical change, but it is real. I have witnessed it.

And the good news is that anyone can tap this power. All we need to do is ask and believe.