Bible app banned as Muslim extremism surges

National policy of religious tolerance facing headwinds

A decision to prevent citizens of Indonesia from being able to access a Bible application for cell phones and mobile devices is sparking arguments amid that nation’s openly tolerant campaign to allow people to choose their own faith and practice it.

The worldwide Christian ministry Barnabas Fund is reporting that the Bible application for the Minangkabau people was removed from the Google Play Store for residents of Indonesia following a demand from Irwan Prayitno, the governor of West Sumatra.

He claimed it was causing discomfort in the Minangkabau people who are living in his province, the majority of whom are Muslim.

Only about 1.43% of the people there, about 69,000, are Christian.

The Indonesian Ulema Council supported the censorship by the nation’s Communication and Information Ministry, with a statement of secretary general Anwar Abbas that said, “The guidance of the Minangkabau people is not the Bible. Hopefully there will not be a Bible [published] in the Minangkabau language.”

“The decision to ban the Minangkabau Bible App failed to take into account the rights of Minangkabau Christians,” the Barnabas Fund reported.

And the decision was criticized by the chief of the nation’s longtime Agency for Pancasila Ideology Education, which advocates for tolerance.

That agency’s opinion is that holy books could be translated into any language as long as they were not misinterpreted.

The chief of the agency said, “Every individual is given the freedom to observe their beliefs as long as they do not cause disruption in the public. And, of course, some of the residents of West Sumatra are also Christian, and the governor himself is governor to everyone, not a certain ethnicity or religious belief.”

Pancasila is a formal doctrine instituted in Indonesia to encourage tolerance for religions – and discourage extremism. It prevailed for many years, with Christians and Muslims living as equals. That started changing only a few years ago.

Then, Barnabas Fund reported, the nation saw “a rise in hard-line Islamic ideology in recent years. A generation ago, Muslims and Christians lived peaceably as equals in accordance with Pancasila.”

“In 2019, the government took several steps to counter the spread of fundamentalism by urging members of the public to report extremist content posted online by civil servants and taking action to replace school textbooks deemed to contain radical material.”

That battle against “hard-line Islamist ideology” includes requests to the public to “report extremist content posted online by civil servants and taking action to replace school textbooks deemed to contain radical material,” Barnabas Fund said.

Indonesian Communications Minister Johnny G. Plate said the intention was “to bring together and improve the performance of our civil servants, as well as to foster higher levels of nationalism.”

Indonesia has the world’s biggest population of Muslims, and reports suggest that 19% of civil servants and 3% of military personnel favor an Indonesia under Islamic rule. About 18% of private employees and 23% of students share the view.

Bible app banned as Muslim extremism surges

Love does not think evil of others

April 29, 2021Author: Nehemiah Zion

Love does not think evil of others.
Nor keeps a record of evil.

Are there people in your life you really want to take revenge on? You still have feelings where you want to get back at them. Even in a small way? Like, maybe, “when I get a chance I will show her ” types?

  • Joseph’s brothers conspired against him
  • King Saul was desperate to kill King David
  • Hamaan had evil desires against Mordecai
  • The Jews looked for ways to bring Jesus down

Joseph’s brothers were irritated by his constant tattling and showing off (Jacob expressed great love for Joseph). Eventually their harmful thoughts against Joseph led to evil.

King Saul loved David initially. When David would play the harp and drive the evil spirit away. Overtime, as David was being used by God and praised greatly by the people, Saul began to hate him and plotted evil against him.

Haman hated the Jews. He wanted them all killed. Haman had hatched an evil plan against Mordecai, only to fail miserably. The very gallows he had prepared for Mordecai became his death sentence. (Esther 6)

The Jews were plotting to kill Jesus (John 7:1). The Jews claimed to be superior in their religiosity, though they followed the law, they did not understand the love in the law.

Love does not think evil of others

The power of resurrection is the power of love that raised Jesus from the dead. How blessed we are to receive such a great love. Are we living the love powered by the Holy Spirit? Time to examine our lives and live these last days being fruitful for the kingdom of God, till the very end.

Let go now; do not host evil thoughts against anyone. The Love of God always heals the hearts and minds of those who trust in God. The end is near. Maranatha, Praise God and Amen.

Love is not easily provoked

April 28, 2021Author: Nehemiah Zion

Love is not easily provoked. Are you EASILY provoked? We all get provoked but it gets harmful for us if we are easily provoked. The repercussions of hosting evil spirits like hatred, anger and the likes weaken us spiritually.

Love protects our heart from wicked provocation. While we may not always have wicked people attack us; what about those in church or family who you dislike?

When Believers are easily provoked …

Peter was easily provoked when Samaria rejected Jesus (Luke 9:55). He was so enraged because his Master Jesus was rejected he wanted Jesus to bring fire down from heaven. Forgetting the very fact that Jesus had come to save and not to destroy.

“For the Son of man is not come to destroy men’s lives, but to save them. And they went to another village.” (Luke‬ ‭9:56‬) ‭

Moses was easily provoked when he killed the Egyptian who bullied his brethren (Exodus 2:11,12). He had grown up in the house of pharaoh. An upbringing that was fully carnal and filled with earthly pride and violence. The same Moses, 40 years later was called the humblest man on earth. While he did lead Israel having shed all the older carnal natures. He was tested again by his own people. He was again provoked to smite the Rock for water. Rather than speak to the rock. This disobedience cost him his physically entering Canaan.

We live in a world where the slightest provocation causes issues to trend online. Many issues have gone beyond the online world into offline where people have ended up killing the innocent. Outrage is the currency of those who want to divide the world and control the mass population.

It’s a sad sinful world we live in. Not for long. Jesus is coming soon. Turn to Him in prayer and supplication for a broken world. Maranatha, Praise God and Amen!

Love is not easily provoked

What Else Does Your Light Convey?

  by Joe Rodriguez

This functional baseball bat-shaped beacon is known as the Chirma Hang “Baseball” Lighthouse and it is located in Busan, South Korea. It, along along with a sculpture of a ball and a glove, was built to symbolize the importance of baseball to Busan and to commemorate Korea’s first ever gold medal in Olympic baseball at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Many other lighthouses have been built in the image of something important to a particular town or province.

Red horse lighthouse in Jehu City, South Korea commemorates the Korean Jehu Horse.

The Baby Bottle Lighthouse is also in Busan, South Korea. It was built to signify the importance of childbirth as well as encourage it. [Read my devotion on this lighthouse titled, The Light of Life)

Once used as lighthouses, The Rostral Columns in St. Petersburg, Russia, were erected to commemorate a naval victory. They each have four pairs of ships prows that represent the four major Russian Rivers.

True followers of Jesus Christ are like lighthouses for God in this world.

“You are the light of the world—like a city on a hilltop that cannot be hidden.”

Matthew 5:14

And even though we shine the light of Christ by spreading the Good News of His salvation, we also portray an image that can either complement or contradict the message we proclaim. Our actions, reactions, and passions play a vital part in demonstrating to the world the genuineness of our faith and the true saving and transforming power of the Gospel.

“Now someone may argue, “Some people have faith; others have good deeds.” But I say, “How can you show me your faith if you don’t have good deeds? I will show you my faith by my good deeds.”

James 2:12

“…[I]n speech, conduct, love, faith and purity, show yourself an example of those who believe.”

1 Timothy 4:12b

What would others notice when they first meet you? What would they say is your true passion after spending some time with you? What do your casual conversations and work and social ethics declare about you as a Christian? Be honest, if someone was to build a lighthouse that depicts what you are passionate about, what would it look like (shape/accents)? Would it include an image of the Bible, a cross, or praying hands? Would it be accented with flowers (if you are an avid gardener)? Or, bald eagles and Siberian tigers (if you advocate for endangered species)? Would it be painted to resemble the inside of a library (if you love books)?

Faro de Ajo is an active lighthouse located in Spain. It was painted with over 70 colors to show off the cultural diversity of the area. It also alludes to the natural wealth of the region by representing local fauna.

There is nothing wrong for a Christian to have a passion for something or support a cause that is non-spiritual. The problem arises when it overshadows spiritual/heavenly devotion.

“Seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need.”

Matthew 6:33

“Set your minds (hearts) on the things that are above, not on the things that are on earth.”

Colossians 3:2

Or when it opposes (in any form) the holy precepts of God as revealed in Scriptures.

“Do not be conformed to this world, but continuously be transformed by the renewing of your minds so that you may be able to determine what God’s will is—what is proper, pleasing, and perfect.”

Romans 12:2

“Do not love the world [of sin that opposes God and His precepts], nor the things that are in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him.” AMP

1 John 2:15

Unfortunately, there are many professing Christians whose true passions shine brighter than the light of Christ. Like those whose love for bling is glaringly obvious. Their lighthouses would most likely be over-laid in gold and accented with precious jewels and all that glitters. What’s even worse, is that there are also those whose lighthouses would be heart-breaking or even offensive to look at. Like those of abortion advocates. Imagine what images those would exhibit!

Hopefully, your lighthouse would first convey your evident love for God and His word by shinning bright and steadily. Then, it would be accented with things that you are really fond of or are devoted to. Maybe it would have images of your favorite animals, foods, vehicles, super heroes, or countries you’ve visited, etc.

God created us for His glory and to enjoy and take care of the earth, not to worship it. He should have first place in our hearts and minds. He also created us uniquely different. That means that our lighthouses can be shaped and adorned in a variety of ways. Just let us make sure that what people notice first is HIS light. Then, whatever else it conveys, it includes things that compliment our love for Him and for others.

By the way, my lighthouse would also convey my love for…lighthouses! 

White lighthouse photoshopped by me to include images of lighthouses.

What else would your lighthouse convey (look like)? I’d like to know. Please share your answer in the comment section below. 

Prayer: Father of light, thank you for who I am in you. May my earthly passions never hinder my love and devotion for you so that your light may continue to shine brightly in and through me. Help me to remain faithful to you and your Word. In Jesus name, I pray, Amen.

Related links
The Light of Life

A Reflection of You

https://lighthousedevotions.blog/2021/04/06/what-else-does-your-lighthouse-convey/

Love is not self seeking

April 27, 2021Author: Nehemiah Zion

Love is not self seeking. Love cares for others. When we pray, we pray for another’s good.

Who is God searching for among believers in times of crisis like these?

“I searched for a man among them who would build up the wall and stand in the gap before Me for [the sake of] the land, that I would not destroy it, but I found no one [not even one].” (Ezekiel‬ ‭22:30‬)

God is asking believers to cry and weep for the suffering world. To intercede for the weak and oppressed in prayer. Mostly, believers are focused on physically helping which will always fall short. The other problem with physical help is the temptation of becoming a proud doer. Telling the world of your good deeds. Seeking self.

The saddest aspect of a believer is his lack of belief in God’s call to pray. Praying has powers beyond all the human help put together. Did Israel win the battles because they were great warriors? No. God gave them great victories because of prayer and praise.

Self seeking believers

Ananias and Sapphira kept part of the money, received from selling their property, having promised all. While they started in love, promising help for the ministry, they died in sin because of their lies. They did not truly love God, got trapped in their love for money.

Judas walked as a servant of God, only to give in to greed, seeking his own and rejecting the love of God, literally and spiritually.

How easily we fall away! How dangerous is temptation! How grave is our situation without God! It only takes a moment to throw away everything about God from our lives. The depravity of sin should not be underestimated. If it hadn’t been for the blood of Jesus no one could have been saved.

You can leave all for Christ to minister to the flock, only to turn into an obstinate and dominating person. Loving God means to serve others. If you do not love another then you aren’t preparing for heaven. Love does not misuse the position, but serves to make others fruitful for the glory of God.

Love, to serve.
Love, to give.
Love, in truth.
Maranatha, Praise God and Amen.

VIDEO The Road To Love

All of us on this road of life are searching for and needing love. Unfortunately what we find is, love is not easy. A more familiar expression we experience is rejection and it comes from the ones we love the most.

There are so many forms of rejection we experience. I am learning that looking for love in and through people is a road of hurt, disappointment, insecurity, self doubt, low self esteem, depression, and a loss of true identity.

I believe love was and has always been meant to be found in and through our Savior Jesus Christ.


Philippians 2:2 complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind.

You see Gods love is perfect! When we seek Gods love and learn His patients, grace and commitment to us, we will be forever changed in the way we view love, especially the way we view it in this broken world full of broken people who only know how to give broken love!!!

As we begin to understand God and His love for us and how His love deals with our broken love. We will begin to know how to love others with a Godly love and learn how to receive broken love as He does.

Simon Peter, Do You Love Me?
John 21
So when they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me more than these?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Tend My lambs.” He said to him again a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Shepherd My sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time, “Do you love Me?” And he said to Him, “Lord, You know all things; You know that I love You.” Jesus said to him, “Tend My sheep.” (21:15–17)

Anyway, using the Greek words (in their anglicized forms), here is a summary of the passage.

VERSE 15:

Jesus asked Peter if he agape’d Him

Peter responded that he phileo’d Him

VERSE 16:

Jesus asked Peter if he agape’d Him

Peter responded that he phileo’d Him

VERSE 17:

Jesus asked Peter if he phileo’d Him

Peter responded that he phileo’d Him

The argument made by the scholars is that Jesus asked Peter if he had the highest form of love for Him. However, Peter could only say that he had the lower form of love for His Saviour. Finally, the third time He asked the question using the word for the lower form of love. This showed that Jesus was satisfied if Peter could only love Him with phileo love.

The reason we reject and are rejected is that we only know the lower kind of love phileo.

Our call from God is to first recieve His love, (agape love) which is a higher form of love that is perfected in Christ! Then in return practice giving this kind of love to God and others that our desire to be loved and to love others will be fulfilling!

God bless you today, I hope this was a word of encouragement and healing!

THE ROAD TO LOVE

Is Your Love For Jesus One That Will Never Let Go?

never let go

February 17, 2021Author: Nehemiah Zion

“Jesus never let go my hands,
He will never let go my hands,
Though the storms may come,
And the winds may blow,
He will never let go my hands”

Will you leave me too? Jesus asked His 12 disciples, after many other disciples left following Jesus.

It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life. But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him. And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father. From that time many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with him. (John 6:63-66)

Peters answer is heart-breaking as much as the question from Jesus. “To whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life.” (John 6:68)

Peter the unlearned and ignorant fisherman knew who Jesus was, and what Jesus had. What about you dear believer?

Peter denied Jesus, messed up multiple times, but after the baptism of the Holy Spirit, he lived believing, everyday. God did wonders and miracles in and through him. He believed and saw the glory of God, and he made sure, never to let go.

Never let go of Jesus

Dear believer, you are no different from Peter. The Holy Spirit that he was baptised with is the same working in all Spirit baptised children of God. What’s stopping you to live in power, love and a sound mind? (2 Timothy 1:7).

Soon and very soon, we are going to meet the King. Jesus is our all in all. If you are reading this, wake up from your settled state in life. Rise up in prayer and an intentional personal study of God’s word.

Let God glorify Jesus in and through you. Maranatha, praise God and amen!

VIDEO Peter, Do You Love Me?

John MacArthur Nov 20, 2016

For this morning, we come we come to the 21st chapter of John, and this morning we’re going to finish our study of this incredibly important gospel.  Somebody asked me if I’m always kind of glad when you come to the end of a book and have the satisfaction that it’s completed, and the truth is I have the very opposite reaction. I hate to let it go, because it’s likely that I’ll never be back again to do this; and this is such an incredibly powerful life-transforming experience, especially for me, because of the intensity that I apply to it in order to bring a message to you on the Lord’s Day. So it’s with a measure of sadness that we come to the end of the gospel of John, but it’s going to be, I trust, a wonderfully helpful consummation as we look at the final section. That final section of chapter 21 looks like a lot of verses, and maybe it could be stretched out a little bit. But it is really faithful to the intent of John not to get bogged down here and wander off into all the world and preach the gospel everywhere, but to stick with the emphasis here. This section is really driven right at Peter. Peter, of course, has already been high-profile in the first half of chapter 21. Again, Peter had acted disobediently; and because he was a leader, he led the other apostles who were with him into disobedience.

You remember I told you, they were supposed to be in a mountain waiting for the Lord, but Peter decided that he was going to abandon his call to ministry, if you will, and go back to fishing. There were reasons for that. He had denied the Lord on three separate occasions. I think he felt inadequate. I think he felt guilty. I think he felt weak. He also was a man who didn’t have a lot of patience. He had not yet, along with the apostles, received the Holy Spirit. They were doubtful of their own power, their own ability, to sustain a ministry he knew that he had failed so many times.

The Lord had rebuked him so many times; the others were unsure about the future even though they had seen the risen Christ for the third time in chapter 21 when He met them for breakfast on the shore of the lake in Galilee. So we understand that Peter was really vacillating in his commitment to ministry. If the gospel ended there we wouldn’t really know whether Peter had an official recommissioning, so we’re grateful for verses 15 and following, because this is the restoration, the recalling of Peter, the reassignment of the ministry that God had given him through Christ at the very beginning of the ministry of our Lord.

Back in Matthew 4:19 Jesus met these fishermen, including Peter; told them to drop their nets, leave it all behind and He would make them fishers of men. You remember they all dropped everything, followed Him. This is three years-plus later, and Peter has led his fishermen friends back to fishing in the first part of the chapter. That’s not the Lord’s plan for them. Peter is the leader; he needs to be restored, and behind him will come the others. God has very significant plans for this denying, impatient, impulsive leader by the name of Peter. And as we look at this final section we’re going to see what is essentially a call to faithfulness for any believer, any disciple of Christ, anyone who is going to serve the Lord. This is what a committed Christian looks like. This is a characteristic of committed Christians. To see what our Lord elicits out of Peter is what He wants out of all of us. This is a wonderful model.

Let me begin in verse 15: “So when they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, ‘Simon, son of John, do you love Me more than these?’ He said to Him, ‘Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.’ And He said to him, ‘Tend My lambs’ – or – ‘feed My lambs.’ He said to him again a second time, ‘Simon, son of John, do you love Me?’ He said to Him, ‘Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.’ He said to him, ‘Shepherd My sheep.’ He said to him the third time, ‘Simon, son of John, do you love Me?’ Peter was grieved because he said him the third time, ‘Do you love Me?’ And he said to Him, “Lord, You know all things; You know that I love You.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Tend’ – or feed – ‘My sheep. Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to gird yourself and walk wherever you wished; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands and someone else will gird you, and bring you where you do not wish to go.’ Now this He said, signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when He had spoken this, He said to him, ‘Follow Me!’

“Peter, turning around, saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them; the one who also had leaned back on His bosom” – or chest – “at the supper and said, ‘Lord, who is the one who betrays You?’ So Peter seeing him said to Jesus, ‘Lord, and what about this man?’ Jesus said to him, ‘If I want him to remain until I come, what is that to you? You follow Me!’ Therefore this saying wen tout among the brethren that the disciple would not die; yet Jesus didn’t say to him that he would not die, but only, ‘If I want him to remain until I come, what is that to you?’ This is the disciple who is testifying to these things and wrote these things, and we know that his testimony is true. And there are also many other things which Jesus did, which if they were written in detail, I suppose that even the world itself would not contain the books that would be written.” Just a fascinating portion of Scripture directed at Peter.

Peter is beloved by all of us because he is like us. He has all the failures that we are so familiar with in our own lives. He overestimates himself and underestimates temptation. He think he’s more committed than he is. He thinks he loves the Lord more than he does. He thinks he can face any trial triumphantly; finds out he can’t. By the time we get to this point, even though he has seen the risen Christ, he is really a broken man.

The disciples have not yet received the Holy Spirit, so they have not yet been infused with power, and they are very familiar with their own impotence. It’s very easy for them, as we come to the epilogue in the gospel of John, to just kind of drift back to life the way it used to be, to go back to fishing, which this particular group had been engaged in, with the exception of Thomas. But the Lord is going to call him back, and with him the rest of them, back into significant ministry. They will subsequently be empowered by the Holy Spirit, and they will turn the world upside-down. But it requires a certain commitment for them to be that useful, so here you have a call to follow Christ. It has three components. It is a call to love Christ; it is a call to sacrifice for Christ; it is a call to follow Christ no matter what. That is universally the case.

For every believer, for every follower of Jesus Christ, there is the necessity of a call to love, a call to sacrifice, and a call to obey. That is the stuff of discipleship. So this is a very straightforward, somewhat simple – not simplistic, but simple in the sense that it’s very clear, “Look at what it means to be a disciple.” What comes out of those three things that are very easily articulated – love, sacrifice, and obedience – is still the fact that following Christ is not easy. To love that way is not easy, to sacrifice that way is not easy, and to obey that way is not easy. Salvation is not cheap, it is not easy, it costs everything, everything. We are told by our Lord Himself in His gospel calls that sinners are to submit completely to the Lord Jesus Christ, to find their lives by losing them, to fulfill their lives by emptying them, to live their lives by dying to self.

Salvation is not cheap, it is not easy. Our Lord repeatedly said, “It might require you to hate your father, your mother, your sister, your brother, and your own life. It might require you to turn from everything you possess, all your desires, all your ambitions.” “If you want to follow Me,” – Jesus said – “you must deny yourself, take up your cross,” – which means it may mean death – “and follow Me.” You need to count the cost, and the cost could be your life. The cost will be your life, and maybe your death. This is a very, very extreme call to follow a man.

Why would people do this? Jesus was actually calling for people to become His slave, to abandon their own ambition, desire, control; become slaves of the Lord Jesus Christ. That is extreme. What would motivate that? Why would someone do that? What is the compelling desire that is going to cause me or you or anybody else to sacrifice my life for Christ, to spend my life obeying Him? What’s the motive? Well, that’s where we begin.

The motive is love. That is the only power that can motivate this kind of devotion. I think we understand that even on a human level that people who love greatly, sacrifice greatly. People who love greatly give up things. Love is a powerful, powerful emotion, powerful motivation.

Even earthly love is so powerful it can draw the best out of people, and it can also draw the worst. It is love that makes people sacrifice everything to live with one person the rest of their life. It is love that is so powerful it can destroy a family. It can destroy a marriage; it does all the time. It can destroy a life. It can lead to alcoholism, drugs, suicide, murder.

Love is a powerful emotion on a human level. It is so powerful that people sacrifice their own lives for it on the positive side, giving up their life for the one they love, giving up their life, if need be, for the children. Some have such great love for causes that are even beyond personal causes, that they will give their lives for their nation, for their neighbors.

In John 15:13, Jesus said, “Greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his philn, the ones He loves.” People die for love. It is a powerful, powerful motivation. And as far as Christians are concerned, according to 2 Corinthians 5:14, it is the love that we have for the Lord that controls us, that’s what Paul said. It is that love that controls us. Some of the translations of 2 Corinthians 5:14 say: constrains us, motivates us, drives us. Really you follow your love, you follow your love, the things you love; you follow those things in life, whatever they be, even objects that you love, experiences that you love, as well as people that you love.

Love is a powerful, powerful motivator, more powerful than any other. And when you move it into the spiritual dimension and the divine world, love is what causes us to serve the Lord in an extreme act of dedication. In fact, we go to the Old Testament, what do we hear our responsibility is? It is this, reiterated in Matthew 22:37 by our Lord Himself: “You are to love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength.” That in itself sums up the law. You can have the law of God.

All His laws in the Old Testament directed toward how we respond to Him. You can condense them into the first half of the Decalogue, which relates to how we treat God, or you can condense them once more into one statement: “You love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength.” That is how you are to live, you are to live a life of love. The Bible never calls for a life of legalism, a life of law, a life of dread, a life of fear; it always calls for us to love God.

And then the second part of that great command like it is, “Love your neighbor as yourself.” That fulfills the second half of the Decalogue and all the other laws that God gave that deal with human relationships. Love is the driving power in life. It is the driving power in the kingdom as well.

Back in Deuteronomy, when our Lord was reiterating His requirements for His people as they were on the brink of going into the Promised Land, chapter 6, verse 4,  He says, “Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord is one! You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your sons, talk of them when you sit in your house, when you walk by the way, when you lie down, when you rise up. Bind them as a sign on your hand and on the front of your forehead. Write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.” What are you writing? “The Lord is one and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your might.” That’s what you teach your children. That is the summation of all that should be said about our relationship to God.

Listen to the 10th chapter of Deuteronomy, verse 12: “Now, Israel, what does the Lord your God require from you, but to fear the Lord your God, to walk in all His ways and love Him, and to serve the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul.” Do you see the totality of that commitment? Every faculty, every aspect of your being is to be loving God. And then as a result, “If you love God with all your heart and all your soul, you will keep the Lord’s commandments and statutes which I am commanding you today for good.”

Again, in chapter 11, “You shall” – verse 1 – “therefore love the Lord your God, and always keep His charge, His statutes, His ordinances, and His commandments.” That’s Old Testament. It’s about loving God. That’s what God called the world to do, to love Him, to love Him.

Our Lord makes it clear in the 14th chapter of John. As you remember, on the night before His crucifixion in the upper room, verse 15, John 14, He says to the disciples and to all of us, “If you love Me, you’ll keep My commandments.” Verse 21, “He who has My commandments and keeps them is the one who loves Me; and he who loves Me will be loved by My Father, and I will love him and disclose Myself to him.” Verse 23, “If anyone loves Me, he’ll keep My word. My Father will love him; We will come to him and Our abode with him.” Verse 28, “If you loved Me, you would have rejoice because I go to the Father.”

It’s all about love. From the beginning, from the Mosaic revelation to the very New Testament and all through the New Testament, and the summation of all that the apostles write, we are called to love God with all our faculties. It’s about loving Him.

John makes obviously a major point of this when he writes his epistles. His epistles are about loving God in the same way, and John extends them from not only loving God, but loving brothers. He does that in chapter 2, chapter 3, chapter 4, chapter 5 of 1 John. So when we talk about what characterizes believers, dedicated believers, it begins by saying they are driven by compelling love for Christ, compelling love for Christ.

Love is the power of obedience. Love is the power of duty. Love is the power of service. Love is the power of sacrifice. Love is the power of worship. Love is the power of fellowship. Love is everything. So you see that in the opening verses, verses 15 to 17, and our Lord’s dialogue with the apostle Peter. Here is a man who needs a total restoration.

Now somebody might say, “You know, he’s going to have to have six weeks of therapy to get him back to where he needs to be. There’s got to be a process here. There’s got to be some kind of path. There’s got to be some kind of course he needs to run. There have to be things he needs to learn. Sanctification is a very complicated thing to get him back on track. We’ve got to have him deal with a lot of his past, and plow through and figure things out, and assess things, and find a way forward.”

No. The Lord asks him one question three times: “Do you love Me? Do you love Me?” because you will follow what you love. You will serve what you love. You will sacrifice for what you love, who you love. That’s the question.

So for us to understand dedication commitment in the way that our Lord explains it here in the illustration with Peter, we start by understanding that a committed Christian lives a life compelled by love for Christ. This is very practical. It’s a wonderful way to end this glorious gospel of John. It almost seems, I suppose, like we’ve come down off this incredible high of the resurrection, post resurrection appearances, and now we’re down with the stumbling and bumbling people in the final chapter. But you have to understand that the glory of Christ is going to be placed in the hands of these stumbling, bumbling people; that this treasure, as Paul says, is in earthen vessels. And so we need to learn at the very end of this the kind of people that God is depending on to proclaim the glory of this gospel.

Now look, Peter overestimated himself a lot. But even in the upper room on Thursday night before the crucifixion, Jesus was talking about the fact that He was going to be leaving, verse 33: “Little children,” – John 13 – “I’m with you a little while longer. You’ll seek Me. As I said to the Jews, I also say to you, ‘Where I’m going, you can’t come.’ A new commandment I give you, that you love one another, even as I have loved you, that you love one another. By this all men will know that you’re My disciples, if you have love for one another.” That is not only the essence of our relationship with God, it’s the essence of our relationship with each other.

“Simon Peter said to Him, ‘Lord, where are You going?’ Jesus answered, ‘Where I go, you cannot follow Me now; but you will follow later.’ Peter said to Him, ‘Lord, why can I not follow You right now? I will lay down my life for You.’ Jesus answered, ‘Will you lay down your life for Me? Truly, truly, I say to you, a rooster will not crow until you deny Me three times.’” And he did.

Three separate occasions, and in each of the three occasions, there were multiple denials. All of them happened that one night at the trial of Jesus in the house of the high priest. Peter had already seen Christ twice, and a third time on the shore of Galilee, so he knew He was alive. But he still had serious doubts about himself, and our Lord had to go to the core of the issue. He had been told to go to Galilee and wait for the Lord. Instead, he went up there for a little while and then went back to his old career, and took all his friends with him.

“Let’s go back to fishing.” That’s what they did before it all began. “We know how to do that; let’s go back and do that.” That wasn’t God’s plan for them. That wasn’t the Lord’s will. So Peter needed to be restored, and we need to know what happens to Peter at the end of the story.

This is a public restoration, by the way, because he’s not alone here. Back in verse 2 you have a list of all of the other disciples who were with him: Thomas, Nathanael, James and John, Philip and Andrew most likely – the crew, for the most part, that were the fishermen, with the addition of Thomas. And our Lord has prepared breakfast for them after the wonderful, miraculous catch of fish, and it’s now time to set the standard for discipleship and He’s going to start with Peter. They’ve all been disobedient; Peter’s going to be the example.

Verse 15: “When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter,” – by the way, John always refers to him as Simon Peter, which kind of gives us the whole picture before and after. I think there may be one exception to that in John’s gospel. But he chooses to call him Simon Peter. “But Jesus says to him, ‘Simon, son of John.’”

Now that must have gotten his attention. That was his name before he met the Lord, and the Lord had given him another name. “You used to be Simon, now you’re Peter.” Peter was the Lord’s name for him. But Peter had fallen so far that the Lord is using his old name, because he’s acting like his old self. This is like when you did something wrong and your mother called you by your entire name.

This must have been a shock. Peter didn’t necessarily want to be pointed out, he would like to have blended into the group. But he is pointed out, the Lord calls him out, and three times asked him if he loves Him, one for each occasion of denial. For each time that he denied Him, he gets an opportunity to be restored. And here is the restoration, it’s as simple as this: “Simon, son of John,” – or Jonas – “do you love Me?” That’s the question. That’s always the question to ask a disobedient believer, because what is being manifest in any act of disobedience is love. And when you act disobediently, you’re declaring love for something other than Christ, and Peter had done that.

So He says, “Do you love Me more than these?” These what, these men? No, because they had all done the same thing. They were all guilty of a loveless disobedience. He means nets, boats, fish. “Do you love Me more than these things that go with your former life? Are you prepared to give this up, to abandon all your successes, your chosen career? Are you willing to give it all up? Do you love Me enough to do that?”

And the word He uses is agapaó. That’s that high love – the noblest, purest, best; the love of the will. We talk about agape love; that’s a noun form of it. It is love in its fullest sense, love in its deepest sense, love in its greatest sense, love, I guess you could say, in its purest form – divine love.

“Do you really love Me, Peter, at the highest level?” That is the critical question. And that is the key to commitment. It was John Calvin who said, “No man will steadily persevere in the discharge of his ministry unless the love of Christ shall reign in his heart.”

“Do you love Me enough to live for Me? Do you love Me enough to walk away from this? Are you constrained by loving Me? Do you have a love for Me” – in the words of Paul in Ephesians 6:24 – “that is incorruptible love? Do you really love Me in the fullest sense?”

So Peter replies, “He said to Him, ‘Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.’” But he changed the word. Jesus used the word agapaó, Peter used the word phileó, he dropped down a notch. Phileó is a kind of brotherly love, kind of warm affection, a friendship love.

Look, Peter couldn’t say, “Yes, You know that I love You at the highest level of love.” That just wouldn’t fly. I mean he had denied Him, and now He had disobeyed Him, and He had enough sense not to be an absolute hypocrite and say, “Of course, I love You at the highest level.” So he says, “Lord, I have great affection for You.” He dared not claim agapaó, but he did claim phileó. But even with that, he has to lean on omniscience: “Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.”

Now some people think omniscience is frightening; I think it’s a blessing. You say, “Well, that means the Lord knows everything you’re thinking, the Lord knows all about you.” Absolutely. What a blessing that is, because even when we don’t demonstrate it, He knows we love Him.

I’m happy to allow Him to know the things that I wish He wouldn’t know if He can also know the things that I desperately want Him to know, that I love Him. And he had to appeal to the omniscience of the Lord. In a broken and a contrite spirit he refuses to acknowledge the love at the level our Lord put it. But he says, “I have a great affection for You. It’s not what it should be, but it’s real.”

This is amazing. He said to him, “Tend” – or – “feed” – boskó is the verb – “pasture My lambs, pasture My lambs.” Amazing. With a less than perfect love, with a less than ideal love, with a less than noble love, with a less than elevated love, the Lord accepts him and says, “Pasture My lambs. Feed My lambs.”

And I just want to call to your attention that personal pronoun is very important, because whoever we shepherd doesn’t belong to us. This is a calling that Peter reminds all of us about in 1 Peter 5 when he writes and he says, “We are all under-shepherds and Christ is the Chief Shepherd.”

If you’re in ministry, if you’re caring for any other believers in any way, you are shepherding His sheep, not yours. No congregation belongs to a pastor or an elder. No Sunday School class belongs to a teacher. No believers in a family belong, in a spiritual sense, to parents. They’re His. It’s a stewardship that in some ways is really frightening. That’s why in Matthew the Lord tells us to be careful how we treat each other, because not only do they belong to Christ, but Christ is in them. So many people don’t understand pastoral ministry as caring for His sheep.

“Peter, pasture My lambs. The most vulnerable, the most weak, the most prone to wander, the most delicate – I turn them over to you. Care for them.” That’s what pastoral ministry is. It’s not about the world, it’s not about how you handle a culture, it’s how you handle His sheep. “If you love Me, then give your life to shepherding My lambs – the most vulnerable, the most dangerous, the weakest.”

You say, “Well that’s wonderful that the Lord would settle for that.” It is, but He’s not done. Verse 16: “He said to him again a second time, ‘Simon, son of John, do you love Me?’” Same word agapaó. “He said to Him, ‘Yes, Lord; You know that I love You.’ ‘Okay,’ He said to Him, ‘Shepherd My sheep, not just the little ones, but all the rest.’ In other words, ‘No more fishing; shepherd My sheep. This is your calling.’”

And then in verse 17, “He said to him a third time, ‘Simon, son of John,’ – again, painfully repeated three times – ‘do you love Me?’ – and with that word, He dropped down to Peter’s word – ‘Do you really phileó Me?’ – in other words, He’s questioning even that – ‘Do you really have strong affection for Me? Do you really?’” Peter’s deeds didn’t even support that.

Jesus probes deep into Peter. This is corrective surgery. It cuts deep, it’s painful, but it can be healed. “He says,” – says John – “Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time.” He’s not grieved because He said it three times; there were three denials. He’s grieved, because the third time He says, “Do you phileó Me?” and even questions that love. “And, again, he says, ‘Lord, You know all things; You know that I love You.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed My sheep, tend My sheep, pasture My sheep. No more fishing. No more fishing. Your job is My little lambs, My sheep.’”

Back in chapter 10 He talked about how He loved the sheep, how He gave His life for the sheep, how the sheep knew Him and He knew them. And now He’s handing them over to Peter. “I’m entrusting you with them, and I need to know that you love Me more than you love this, so that you’re going to be faithful to give your life for them.” So three times Peter had the opportunity to tell the Lord he loved Him. You might have thought that the Lord would have discarded Peter at this point since Peter really couldn’t even defend, by his behavior, that lower level of love. But the Lord accepted him and said, “Pasture My sheep.”

We are truly clay pots. The Lord has to use those of us who have an inferior love. First Thessalonians 4 talks about how we’re taught of God to love in verse 9. And then verse 10 it says, “But you need to excel even more.” We’re told that our love should abound.

But this is where all Christian commitment starts: “Do you love Christ more than” – fill in the blank, whatever it is. “Do you love Him more? Then serve Him.” I can tell what you love by what you serve, what you do, what the priorities of your life are. A committed Christian is compelled, driven by love for Christ, and that shows up in his or her life, a life given to His flock.

Secondly – and this is equally important and builds on the first – a committed lives a life compelled by love for Christ, and secondly, characterized by sacrifice for Christ. This is costly love. I already quoted Luke 9:23, “If any man will come after Me, let him deny himself, take up his cross” – it could mean you’re going to die.

And that’s exactly what Peter hears in verse 18: “Truly, truly, I say to you,” – that’s been repeated many times in the gospel of John: truly, truly, a formula for something that is absolutely true – “I say to you, when you were younger, you used to gird yourself and walk wherever you wished. You put on your own belt, you lived your life the way you wanted to. You had freedom, you called the shots, you did whatever you wanted to do. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands and someone else will gird you, and bring you where you do not wish to go.”

He’s saying to Peter, “In the future, Peter, you’re going to be taken prisoner. You’re going to be bound and hauled off to a place you don’t want to go. Then” – He says – “you’re going to stretch out your hands” – that is a euphemism for crucifixion. That’s how people were crucified. He’s telling Peter, “When you get old, Peter, you’re going to be crucified. You’re going to be taken prisoner and you’re going to be crucified.”

How do I know that? Verse 19 says it: “Now this He said, signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God.” Peter finds out here he’s going to be a martyr. He’s going to be a crucified martyr. And you remember the story that tradition gives us, that when it came time for him to be crucified, he didn’t feel he was worthy to be crucified as the Lord was, so he asked to be crucified upside-down. “So, Peter, welcome back to the ministry. Go feed My sheep, go feed My lambs, and know this, that sometime in the future when you’re old, you’re going to be arrested, you’re going to be crucified.”

You might stop and say, “Well that is really bad news. Why would You tell him that? Why would you tell Him that? Better not to know, right, let it be a surprise.” No, it’s important to tell him that. He needed to know what? He needed to know that the next time he got in a life and death situation he would not deny his Lord. He needed to know that. He needed to know that when they took him and captured him, and tied him up, and stretched out his hands, and nailed him to a cross, he would glorify God.

I think he lived the rest of his life with a newfound confidence that overcame his self-doubt, because he had been such a failure at the trial of Christ. I think this put power into his life. I think this put hope into his heart. I think this added confidence to him and boldness. I think he may have otherwise feared that, “If I ever get into that situation again, what am I going to do?” and that would have sucked all of his confidence out. This is a great gift to this man: “You’re going to be arrested, crucified. You’re going to die, but in it, you’re going to glorify God.” Good news.

This is the ultimate sacrifice, and that’s how believers live. This is the extreme requirement for a committed life. Peter had said, Luke 22, “I’m ready to go with you to prison and death.” Didn’t work out that way first time; it would work out that way the last time. In the end, he will die for his Lord. This is a beautiful life-changing promise. Peter has to be ecstatic, thrilled. His heart has to be soaring. His hopes are flying. His boldness is being elevated as he heads toward a triumphant encounter with those who will kill him for his faithfulness to Christ. That’s what dedication is.

The third thing: a life that is truly dedicated to the Lord is compelled by love for Christ, characterized by sacrifice for Christ, and content with following Christ. The end of verse 19: “When Jesus had spoken the words about Peter’s death, He said this to him, ‘Follow Me! Follow Me!’” So important: “Follow Me!” Simple enough.

In a wonderful gesture, I think the Lord turned and started walking away, and Peter’s going to follow Him, at least for two steps, because in verse 20 it says, “Peter turning around.” What? This guy is incorrigible. “What are you turning around for?”

Well, he saw the disciple whom Jesus loved following them, you know, the one who leaned on Jesus at the supper, that’s John. He sees John, you know, John, the one who asked the question, “Lord, who’s the one at the table who’s going to betray You?” And verse 21, “Peter seeing John said to Jesus, ‘Lord, Lord, what about him? So I’m going to be crucified. What about him?’” Peter is a project. “What about him?”

I love the answer. “Jesus says to him” – in verse 22, it’s really hyperbole and sarcasm – ‘If I want him to remain until I come, what is that to you? You follow Me! Look, if I decide he’s going to live till the second coming, it’s none of your business. Follow Me!’”

I mean this is the kind of focus that our Lord wants: “Follow Me! Don’t compare yourself with somebody else. Don’t ask what God has for somebody else, you just follow Me wherever that leads” – and for him, it’s going to lead to death. “What about John; it’s irrelevant. If I want him to live till the second coming, what is that to you?”

That would be interesting, wouldn’t it, if he were still here. Well, that’s what some people thought, verse 23: “Therefore this saying went out among the brethren that that disciple would not die.” That’s gossip for you; they never get it right. It’s ridiculous, “John’s going to live till the second coming.”

The Lord has to straighten that out. Jesus didn’t say to him that he wouldn’t die, He just said, “If I want him to remain to come, what is that to you?” He had to correct a rumor, because if people actually believed Jesus said he wasn’t going to die and he died, then Jesus didn’t know, and they got it wrong. We’ve got to protect His integrity. “Peter, please, just follow Me. Don’t worry about John. Don’t worry about anybody else.” Like Paul, we’re not comparing ourselves with others, “Just follow Me.” First Timothy 4:16, “Take heed to yourself.” You’ve got plenty to work on right there.

Peter would be faithful, he would be focused. And, oh, by the way, John didn’t live till the second coming, he died on the Isle of Patmos at the end of the first century in exile. But he also was Peter’s companion, right? From the Day of Pentecost on to the first part of the book of Acts, it was Peter and John together.

So the Lord wasn’t saying, “You’re not going to have anything to do with John.” The Lord was saying to him, “You follow My plan for you, not My plan for him.” Peter was crucified upside-down; John lived much longer than Peter. God had a different plan; Christ had a different plan for John.

Peter is restored. And, oh, by the way, John, who is being referred to here, adds his own little final note in verse 24: “This is the disciple who is testifying to these things and wrote these things, and we know that his testimony is true.” There is John saying, “The one that he was talking about, that’s me, and I’m the one who wrote all of this and it’s the truth.” The apostle authenticates his own gospel. The apostle authenticates his own gospel: “It’s the truth.” What a touching personal end.

And, again, why does it end this way? You know, we’ve been to the heights. We’ve been through the cross, through the resurrection. The glory of Christ has been demonstrated, verse 31, that culminating statement: “These things have been written that you may believe Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and believing might have life in His name,” – this great gospel reality.

And in the final chapter, we just come back down to earth and we meet these two guys. That is such a fitting ending, because the glory of the gospel eventually ends up with us, right, ends up with us and whether or not we’re going to love Christ, sacrifice for Him, and be content to follow Him.

And then a final word. There’s just one other question to ask: “Why didn’t John say more about Jesus?” Well, he says, “There are also many other things which Jesus did, which if they were written in detail, I suppose that even the world itself wouldn’t contain the books that would be written.”

Now that may seem like hyperbole to you, but we live in a fascinating technological world. Just your life alone and all the words you’ve ever said, ever written, have ever been sent to you, written about you; all the interaction you’ve ever had in this world; I read by the time you’re done with your life could fill 320 libraries; and that just you, and who cares, right?

And you understand that there are so many bits of data in the world that they’re literally uncountable. It’s amazing how one person with one mouth and one pen can generate the volume of experiences that could be written about, conversations that could be recorded, letters that could be repeated, copied. Oh, by the way, it’s all copied, it’s in the cloud; not God’s cloud, it’s in Google’s cloud. But it’s also in God’s cloud. And you would be amazed to know that even though you probably have a maximum of, oh, maybe 20,000 words in your vocabulary, that stretches into an almost infinite number of bits just to represent your one life.

John didn’t know all about that, but he did know that if everything Jesus ever did was written out in full, and everything He ever said was recorded, the world wouldn’t be able to contain it; it would have to be up in the cloud. Someday we’ll have access to that. When we get into God’s cloud and go to heaven, I think we’ll know the full story.

Father, we thank You again this morning for a wonderful opportunity to have our lives examined by Your Word, because that’s what it does, it shines a light on us. It discloses us. It is the revealer of the thoughts and intents of the heart. We thank You for the searchlight of Your precious Word. We thank You for the joy that it brings, the comfort, the encouragement, the counsel, the wisdom, the knowledge, the conviction, the correction. And we would all want to be like You wished Peter to be, motivated by love for You over love for anything and everything else, not loving the world or the things that are in the world, because then the Love of the Father’s not in us. But loving You, we want to be willing to sacrifice for You in life, and even in death if need be. And just in that simple way, we want to follow You, not asking about somebody else or what you have for them, but what You have for us.

Lord, we want to be used by You with all of our frailty. We feel like Peter. We want to say we love You. We can’t climb a mountain of that highest love and say we’ve reached the peak. It’s a lesser love that we claim, and that might even be questionable. But You know our hearts, You know we love You, and we want to serve You. We want to shepherd Your sheep and tend Your lambs. So, Lord, would You count us faithful, know our hearts, and know that we do love You. We are willing to sacrifice for You. We do desire to follow; and in so doing, may You find us useful to Your glory. This is our prayer.

Thank You for all that this wonderful gospel has meant to us and will continue to mean. And as the messages go out around the world in years to come, may they always accomplish Your purpose. And may it be that the testimony that John has written, as he said, will be seen as true, as true. And may the truth enlighten many, many souls to salvation, for Your glory. Amen.

https://www.gty.org/library/sermons-library/43-116

Lasting Love On Mother’s Day

by Jim Parisi on May 15, 2003

A Mother’s Day Comment by Chuck Swindoll:

I remember a Mother’s Day card I saw that was really cute. It was a great big card written in a little child’s printing—little first-grade printing. On the front was a little boy with untied sneakers. He had a wagon, and toys were everywhere. He had a little cut on his face and there were smudges all over this card. It read, “Mom, I remember that little prayer you used to say for me every day,” Inside was the prayer: “God help you if you ever do that again.”

What greater Love then the love of a mother?

Mother’s day is the day we honor mothers here in the United States.

What greater Love between two Humans then the love between a mother and her child.

We are going to look in to the power of Love for one another.

1 Corinthians 13:1–13, especially verse 1: “Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal.”

You’re never too old for your mother to correct you.

Introduction: According to the Knoxville News-Sentinel, Police Chief Phil Keith was in the middle of a city council meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee, when his pager beeped. Startled to see that the call was from his mother, he rushed to the press table and phoned her. “Phil Keith, are you chewing gum?” demanded his mom, who had been watching on cable TV. “Yes, ma’am.” “Well, it looks awful. Spit it out.” Keith dutifully removed the gum and went back to his meeting.

There’s no one like mothers! The words “mother” and “love” go together like left and right hands, and on this Mother’s Day of 2003,

There’s no better passage to study than the “Love Chapter” of the Bible which describes the agape love of God which is necessary for mothers, fathers, sons, daughters—and for all the rest of us.

1. The Place of Love (vv. 1–3). Love is superior to eloquent words (v. 1). Love is the vital principle, and without it all other endowments, including excellence in communication, is vain. Love is superior to wisdom

(v. 2). If a person could unlock the mysteries of the entire universe and call forth faith to remove mountains, he would be zero without love.

Love is superior to work (v. 3). Albert Barnes notes, “If there is not true piety, there can be no benefit in this to my soul. It will not save me. If I have not true love to God, I must perish, after all. Love therefore, is more valuable and precious than all these endowments. Nothing can supply its place; naught can be connected with salvation without it.”

2. The Portrait of Love (vv. 4–7). Love is patient (v. 4).

It bears injustice without anger or despair.

Love may be practiced (v. 4). It is mild under all irritations and ill usage.

Love produces good manners and courtesy at all times.

Love is pure (v. 4), not jealous or displeased when others are successful.

Love never embarrasses the owner or recipient.

Love is peaceful (v. 4). It is not rash.

Love takes a back seat and is willing to work behind the scenes.

Love does not brag or boast or sing its own praises. Love is polite (v. 5), doing nothing to cause shame.

Love prefers others (v. 5). There is no selfishness in the true love. It seeks the good of others.

Love is not easily provoked (v. 5). When love holds the reins of the soul, there is little danger of provocation to anger and spiteful action that leads to sin.

Love is preclusive (v. 5). It does not condemn on suspicion or without evidence, nor is it malicious nor disposed to find fault.

Love exhibits propriety (v. 6). It does not sympathize with evil, nor does it delight in anything that does not conform to the standard of right.

Love takes pleasure in truth (v. 6). Love rejoices in the virtues of others, not their vices.

Love is pleasant (v. 7). Love maintains a disposition that refuses to make public or to avenge the faults of others.

Love is not suspicious. It trusts others. Love brightens all things, bears all things and braves all things.

3. The Permanence of Love (vv. 8–13). Love’s permanency is suggested by the phrase “love never fails” (v. 8).

Love will always abide, may always be exercised, and can be adapted to all circumstances in which we may be placed.

Love’s pre-eminence is suggested by the phrase “but the greatest of these is love” (v. 13).

Love is the greatest of all gifts, for love makes the rest of the gifts graceful. Love is the one needful thing—our priority.

We lose our goods or even our good names, but if we truly retain love, we have exchanged the temporary for the eternal.

For when the Bible has said all it will say about God, it is contained in the one statement: “God is love.”

Conclusion: There’s an old story that tells of some young pastors who paid a visit to one of the great ministers of the past generation.

They found him preparing to go to a meeting where a strong debate was expected.

He was reading the 13th chapter of 1 Corinthians and praying that its teaching might guide his conduct.

The aged minister felt the need of the restraining hand of divine grace and the calming power of love, lest he should be rash in his speech.

This is the kind of love that lasts.

May God give us loving moms, loving dads, and may He give all of us loving hearts like that.

Double the Dose

There once was a wise old physician, who said to a young doctor,

“I’ve been practicing medicine for a long time. I’ve prescribed many things.

But in the long run, I’ve learned that the best medicine is love.”

“What if it doesn’t work?” asked the young doctor.

Then “Double the dose,” he said.

Lord please give us double dose of your love

Amen……..

Pastoral Prayer:

Heavenly Father, You know that mothering, though a wonderful calling, is a demanding task, filled with anxious moments and wearisome days. We ask You will restore and refresh every mother here today. And we also pray for our mothers these words from Paul’s letter to the Philippians: That their love may abound still more and more in knowledge and all discernment, that they may approve the things that are excellent, that they may be sincere and without offense till the day of Christ, being filled with the fruits of righteousness which are by Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.

Amen……………

https://www.sermoncentral.com/sermons/lasting-love-on-mother-s-day-jim-parisi-sermon-on-women-58206


AUDIO My Mother is the Most Beautiful Woman in the World

By Rev Bill Woods

Exodus 2:1-10

There’s a Russian story of a little girl who, during harvest time got separated from her mother.


She was crying hysterically, shouting for her Mama.

  • People felt sorry for her and tried to help.

Everyone started asking her what her mother’s name was, what she looked like, what she was wearing, plus a lot other questions as well.

  • The little girl got overwhelmed by all the questions and this made her sob even harder.

Finally, she managed to blurt out, “My mother is the most beautiful woman in the whole world!”

One old farmers said, “Finally!  Now we’re getting somewhere!”

  • The people began bringing in the good-looking women.
  • There were blondes, redheads, and brunettes.
  • Some had blue eyes, others hazel, and the rest brown and green.

They were, without a doubt, the prettiest girls that anyone could find.

  • Certainly one of these beauties had to be the girl’s mother!

 One by one, the women were brought to the little girl.

  • She looked at each one and shook her head, “NO” each time.
  • Finally, they came to the last person.
  • “Is this your mother?”

The little girl looked at the beauty in front of her, shook her head and burst into tears.

  • _”I told you, my mother is the most beautiful woman in the whole world!!!”

Suddenly a woman showed up huffing and puffing towards them.

  • “I’m that child’s mother!”

Everyone peered to get a look at that woman.

  •  She was  a short dumpy, lumpy little woman with a round, pleasant wind-burned face and sparkling eyes.
  • She had rough chapped hands and soiled tattered clothes–she wasn’t a conventional beauty.

She rushed over to the little girl, scooped her up in her arms and smothered her with kisses all the while thanking the people for taking care of her daughter and keeping her safe.

The little girl was no longer crying, but was beaming from ear to ear.

She told everyone triumphantly, “I told you my mother was the most beautiful woman in the whole world!”

  •  To everyone else, the woman holding the child was plain and ordinary, but to her little girl she was, without question, THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMAN IN THE WORLD!

There’s a lesson there, we do not love people because they are beautiful. 

  • They are beautiful because we love them!

My Mom used to worry that when I went to college I’d come home ashamed of my humble roots and be too proud to want to associate with my family.

    – She didn’t have anything to worry about — I loved my family and my home.

Again, We don’t love people because they’re beautiful – they’re beautiful because we love them.

   – We don’t love people because they’re rich —our bond and fellowship is rich because we love them.

A mother was fixing supper when her little boy came in and handed her a piece of paper he’d written.  Mom dried her hands on an apron — she read it:

For cutting the grass $5.00

For cleaning my room this week $1.00

For going to the store for you .50

Baby-sitting my kid brother for you while you went shopping .25

Taking out the garbage $1.00

For getting a good report card $5.00

For cleaning up and raking the yard $2.00

Total Owed: $14.75

His mom looked at him standing there expectantly — you could see memories flashing through her mind. She picked up the pen, turned over the paper and wrote:

For the 9 months I carried you while you grew inside me, No Charge.

For all the nights I’ve sat up with you, doctored and prayed for you, No Charge.

For all the trying times, and all the tears you’ve caused through the years, No Charge.

When you add it all up, the cost of my love is, No Charge.

For all the nights that were filled with dread, and for the worries I knew were ahead, No Charge.

For the toys, food, clothes, and even wiping your nose, there’s No Charge, Son.

And when you add it all up, the full cost of real love is No Charge.

When the boy finished reading what his mother had written, there were tears in his eyes — he looked up at her and said, “Mom, I sure do love you.”                                                                                    .  

– He took the pen and in big letters he wrote: “PAID IN FULL.”

I’ve been blessed to be personally involved with 3 wonderful mothers in my life.                                       .  

– My wife, my Mom, my Grandmother — and now to watch my two daughters, and two granddaughters realize how important it is to be good moms!          

Mother’s Day is special to me.…………………

Today, I want to talk about 2 very special Moms in the Bible.

First, Moses’ mom, Jochebed

Exodus 2:1-10
1  About this time, a man and woman from the tribe of Levi got married.
2  The woman became pregnant and gave birth to a son. She saw that he was a special baby and kept him hidden for three months.
3  But when she could no longer hide him, she got a basket made of papyrus reeds and waterproofed it with tar and pitch. She put the baby in the basket and laid it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile River.
4  The baby’s sister then stood at a distance, watching to see what would happen to him.
5  Soon Pharaoh’s daughter came down to bathe in the river, and her attendants walked along the riverbank. When the princess saw the basket among the reeds, she sent her maid to get it for her.
6  When the princess opened it, she saw the baby. The little boy was crying, and she felt sorry for him. “This must be one of the Hebrew children,” she said.
7  Then the baby’s sister approached the princess. “Should I go and find one of the Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?” she asked.
8  “Yes, do!” the princess replied. So the girl went and called the baby’s mother.
9  “Take this baby and nurse him for me,” the princess told the baby’s mother. “I will pay you for your help.” So the woman took her baby home and nursed him.
10  Later, when the boy was older, his mother brought him back to Pharaoh’s daughter, who adopted him as her own son. The princess named him Moses, for she explained, “I lifted him out of the water.”

The Israelites had it pretty plush because of Joseph……………… 

BUT,                                                   

Exodus 1:8 — Eventually, a new king came to power in Egypt who knew nothing about Joseph or what he had done.

The Jewish nation was growing so fast Pharaoh was worried he’d lose control and these Hebrews would take over Egypt.

    – This king thought it necessary to weaken his Jewish subjects by oppressing them, and by    degrees reducing their number.

To subdue them, he enslaved them, and used them to build numerous buildings, especially store-cities, temples, and palaces.

    – The Israelites became slaves serving the Egyptians under very harsh circumstances.

Their lives were bitter from hard bondage — Exodus 1:13, 14 So the Egyptians worked the people of Israel without mercy. 14 They made their lives bitter, forcing them to mix mortar and make bricks and do all the work in the fields. They were ruthless in all their demands.

    – His oppression didn’t slow their population growth..

      – Instead — Exodus 1:12 — But the more the Egyptians oppressed them, the more the Israelites multiplied and spread, and the more alarmed the Egyptians became.

Then the king demanded the midwives kill all the Hebrew baby boys at birth.

    – The king’s orders weren’t rigorously enforced; the little boys were spared by the midwives, so “the people multiplied” more than ever.

Next, the king issued a proclamation ordering people to throw all the Hebrew baby boys into the river and drown them. — Exodus 1:22 Then Pharaoh gave this order to all his people: “Throw every newborn Hebrew boy into the Nile River. But you may let the girls live.”

    – The people wouldn’t do it — the king was frustrated.

One of the Hebrew families — Amram and his wife Jochebed and 2 children, 15 year old Miriam, and 3 year old Aaron lived in or near Memphis, the capital city at that time.

A baby boy was born to this family in 1571 B.C.

    – His mother hid him in the house for 3 months.

      – Imagine the stress of trying to keep him quiet so the authorities wouldn’t find him……

It became too hard to hide him.

    – Jochebed came up with on a bold plan to get her boy noticed by the king’s daughter. 

      – She built a little boat of papyrus reeds and laid it among the bulrushes growing on the edge of the river where the princess took her bath.

  • I guess you could say, Moses started out a basket case!

Her plan succeeded!  — The Princess heard the baby crying and found him.

      – Miriam was watching nearby and the Princess sent her to find a nurse, Miriam brought

        Moses’ mother.

    – The Princess said, “Take this child away, and nurse him for me, and I’ll give you your  wages.”

WOW!  Look how God works!  Jochebed’s baby was given back to her along with pay to raise him.

The princess named him “Moses”  Exodus 2:10 — Later, when the boy was older, his    mother brought him back to Pharaoh’s daughter, who adopted him as her own son. The princess named him Moses, for she explained, “I lifted him out of the water.”

    – Must’ve been like my Dad whose birth certificate said:  “The unnamed Woods Child.”

When the baby was “house broke”, he was moved to the Royal Palace and raised as the adopted son of the Princess.

    – Jochebed continued to care for him and home school him.

He grew up knowing all the grandeur and excitement of the Egyptian court.

    – Mom maintained a constant relationship with him, which was so important to his religious belief and his interest in his Hebrew heritage.

The Egyptians provided his secular education.

    – He had all the advantages of both physical and mental training.

     – He became “learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians” —  Acts 7:22 — Moses was taught all the wisdom of the Egyptians, and he was powerful in both speech and action.

  • It makes you wonder why he would try to side-step God in answering God’s call by saying, “Here I am, send Aaron, I am slow of speech.”Exodus 4:10

Egypt had 2 universities — he probably attended Heliopolis to complete his education.

     – Moses was probably 20 years old when he completed his formal Egyptian education.

      –  It’d be another 20 years before he took his place in Bible history.

       – Josephus wrote those 20 years were probably spent in military service where he became a hero in the war waged between Egypt and Ethiopia.

      – He gained prestige as a skillful general, and became “mighty in deeds”

What a successful Mom, Jochebed was!   Hebrews 11:24-25  
24  It was by faith that Moses, when he grew up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. He chose to share the oppression of God’s people instead of enjoying the fleeting pleasures of sin.

  • He could’ve been a prince, possibly the next Pharaoh, but because of his Mom, he chose to go God’s way!  (Did you catch that Mom and Dad?)

Jochebed overcame so many obstacles to give her boy the foundation he needed to serve God.

So many parents complain they can’t raise their kids for God with the pressures of today’s society  — “If you think you can or you can’t — you’re right!”  

Mom (and Dad) God’s entrusted you with that life — one day you’ll account for the responsibility God’s entrusted to you.  

When Tammy was born, Marty had a tremendous spiritual experience as she realized the impact of her responsibility to God and to this precious little life God had entrusted to her……….                               .  

– She promised God she would do her best to raise both of our girls for Him. 

But what if your kids are already grown and those formative years are past?

There’s still prayer and a positive witness of what God’s doing in your life.  – Still grandkids!                                                                                                   

It’ll take dedication and will, but you can do what must be done!

There was also the Nameless mother in Matthew 15:21-28:
21  Then Jesus left Galilee and went north to the region of Tyre and Sidon.
22  A Gentile woman who lived there came to him, pleading, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David! For my daughter is possessed by a demon that torments her severely.”
23  But Jesus gave her no reply, not even a word. Then his disciples urged him to send her away. “Tell her to go away,” they said. “She is bothering us with all her begging.”
24  Then Jesus said to the woman, “I was sent only to help God’s lost sheep—the people of Israel.”
25  But she came and worshiped him, pleading again, “Lord, help me!”
26  Jesus responded, “It isn’t right to take food from the children and throw it to the dogs.”
27  She replied, “That’s true, Lord, but even dogs are allowed to eat the scraps that fall beneath their master’s table.”
28  “Dear woman,” Jesus said to her, “your faith is great. Your request is granted.” And her daughter was instantly healed.

Jesus put up barriers to test her faith and determination.

She passed His test because she wouldn’t let any barrier keep her child from being ministered to by Jesus.

    – There are a lot of barriers today — don’t let them stop your child from learning to know Jesus.

Preachers, are told not to get too sentimental about motherhood because:

– for some, motherhood is an accident, and not always a welcome one;
– for some, biological motherhood isn’t possible;
– for some, mothers weren’t all that nice;
– for some, motherhood under the very best of circumstances still isn’t a bed of roses and a primrose path.

Poet Wilhelm Busch’s wrote: “To become a mother isn’t so difficult; on the other hand, being a mother is very much so!”

That goes for dads too!  Just because you sired a child doesn’t make you a dad……………….

So, with all those warnings why bother with Mothers’ Day at all?

I heard about one lady who said she hated Mother’s Day because the sermons were always about the Proverbs 31 mothers…………..She felt like a failure.

Listen:  God will help you succeed as a Mom or a Dad if you will let Him lead you in the way you should go!

Why bother with Mothers’ Day?                                                                           

Because for all its stumbling blocks, pitfalls and broken dreams, for all the soiled diapers, soiled wallpaper and spoiled plans, we’re talking about a beautiful ideal, a natural part of God’s creative plan to bring love and caring to light.                                                                                                           .  

– Motherhood is a constant demand for the gift of love and — caring.  Grandmothers can exemplify that too!

The family and home was God’s idea.    We can’t let the perverts and wierdos ruin God’s Plan of a Mom and a Dad raising children together for the Lord.


PODCAST MY MOTHER IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMAN IN THE WORLD

https://www.buzzsprout.com/824359/8483320

The updated version of Rev Bill Woods book “There Is Still Power In The Blood” will be available soon