VIDEO Abortion And Sex-Trafficking Are Undeniably Linked Abuses Against Women

Abortion and sex trafficking have more in common than many people realize. Both exploit women, and both are an affront to human dignity.

Abortion And Sex-Trafficking Are Undeniably Linked Abuses Against Women

January is both Human Trafficking Awareness Month and Sanctity of Human Life Month. These issues have more in common than people may realize. Across numerous global studies of sex-trafficking survivors, abortion is a consistent part of the story. Both abortion and sex-trafficking are businesses that exploit women, sometimes in tandem as organizations such as Planned Parenthood enable the abuse for profit. And both are an affront to human dignity.

Pimps Use Abortion to Maximize Profits

The risk of pregnancy is part of the sex-trafficking industry. Pimps and sex-traffickers are most concerned with profits, so when their victims become pregnant, they often force or pressure them to abort so they can put them right back onto the streets.

It is not unusual for females to be traffickers and to oversee a harem of victims, including taking them to get abortions, according to a 2014 documentary featuring testimony from sex-trafficking survivors. On the other hand, male pimps will sometimes impregnate their victims to keep them under control.

Research shows that, as a whole, women who abort undergo some form of coercion and even violence. In a recent study of women’s abortion experiences, 58.3 percent reported aborting to make others happy, and 73.8 percent said their decision to abort was not free from outside pressure. Homicide due to intimate partner violence is a leading cause of death during pregnancy. Imagine how much greater the coercive pressure to abort is on women who are being sexually exploited for profit.

One sex-trafficking survivor described her experience:

Over the years I had pimps and customers who hit me, punched me, kicked me, beat me, slashed me with a razor. I had forced unprotected sex and got pregnant three times and had two abortions at [a clinic]. Afterward, I was back out on the street again.

Abortion Data Among Trafficking Victims Is Shocking

A ground-breaking study by the Beazley Institute found 66 human-trafficking survivors had a total of 114 abortions — 114 abortions among 66 women. Let that sink in.

While only half of these women specified whether their abortions were voluntary or forced, of those who answered, a majority indicated that coercion played a role in at least one of their abortions. One survivor who endured six abortions recounted, “I was under serious pressure from my pimps to abort the babies.”

Two-thirds of trafficking survivors in the Beazley study had their abortions in clinics; nearly 30 percent said they went to Planned Parenthood. One survivor described her situation:

I got pregnant six times and had six abortions during this time. Several of them were from a doctor who was a client — he did them backdoor. … At least one of my abortions was from Planned Parenthood because they didn’t ask any questions. … You went backdoor where the charge was more like $150.

Several undercover investigations have documented Planned Parenthood’s failure to report rape, as well as its aiding and abetting of sex-trafficking. Planned Parenthood engages in this behavior unchecked, even as its latest financial report reveals a revenue of $1.6 billion.

Traffickers and Abortionists Profit from Human Suffering

Human-trafficking is a $150 billion per year global industry, the second-most profitable form of transnational crime after drug trafficking. It most frequently takes the form of sex-trafficking, which rakes in an estimated $99 billion per year. A study by the Urban Institute that interviewed pimps and traffickers found they can make anywhere from $5,000 to $32,833 a week. Women and girls make up 71 percent of their victims.

The pimps and traffickers interviewed in the Urban Institute study said the commercial sex industry is a low-risk, high-reward enterprise. Part of the reason sex-trafficking is so “low-risk” is due to our society’s lack of awareness, but could it also be due to a lack of intervention — perhaps even aiding and abetting — from those in direct contact with victims and traffickers? Doctors who exploit women for sex and abortion centers that turn a blind eye for profit, such as Planned Parenthood, enable the sex-trafficking industry.

The connection between abortion and sex-trafficking cannot be denied. Both are an affront to human dignity, and both are profiting from human suffering. The survivor of six abortions incurred severe infections from the scar tissue, necessitating a hysterectomy. She could no longer bear children if she wanted. Our message to her and all the other victims of commercialized sex-exploitation is this: We see you.

This January, it’s time for Americans to decide whether we will stand up for millions of women forced to endure trauma upon trauma and the innocent lives snuffed out, or continue to tolerate the abuses of the abortion and sex-trafficking industries.

Patrina Mosley is director of Life, Culture and Women’s Advocacy at Family Research Council.
Photo Kat Jayne/Pexels

https://thefederalist.com/2020/01/31/abortion-and-sex-trafficking-are-undeniably-linked-abuses-against-women/


Groups receiving anti-AIDS taxpayer funds refuse to condemn prostitution

Supreme Court hearing challenge to federal requirement

(Image courtesy Pixabay)

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing a case brought by the federal government against organizations receiving taxpayer funds to combat AIDS that refuse to abide by the requirement that they expressly oppose sex trafficking and prostitution.

The American Center for Law and Justice has submitted a friend-of-the-court brief in the case, U.S. Agency for International Development vs. the Alliance for Open Society International.

Groups receiving grant money through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, PEPFAR, are required to oppose sex trafficking and prostitution.

The program is credited with saving millions of lives.

ACLJ said that while the policy “seems like common sense, particularly in the face of known health risks associated with each and the immense societal damage and human rights violations associated with trafficking, grantees have claimed that ‘policy requirement’ violated their First Amendment rights.”

The case previously came before the Supreme Court, which agreed that the requirement was unconstitutional and returned the case to the lower courts.

There, a judge struck down the policy “not just as to domestic grant applicants, but also their foreign affiliates.”

So the federal government is back at the Supreme Court, still fighting for the requirement that recipients oppose prostitution and trafficking.

“When selecting among competing applicants for discretionary funding, government can look to the relevant qualifications of the applicant to ensure the effectiveness of a government program,” ACLJ argues.

“For example, government could disqualify tobacco merchants from an anti-smoking campaign, or require a documented pro-democracy record or policy for applicants to receive funding in a program to promote democratic principles and institutions abroad.”

ACLJ argues the requirement is an effort by the government to find the best-suited applicants.

“Congress is certainly entitled to judge that those with a demonstrated commitment are more likely to be dependable and effective in carrying out the program as Congress designed it,” ACLJ said in a brief.

Since trafficking and prostitution contribute to the spread of HIV, the legal group argues, why “would it not be legitimate for Congress, when doling out money, to prefer those grantees who explicitly oppose such destructive practices?”

A hearing is scheduled for next month.

ACLJ contends the requirement is “nothing more than a means of selecting suitable agents to implement the government’s chosen strategy.”

 

Original here


VIDEO The Pornification of America: How Young Girls Are Being Groomed by Sexual Predators

“The brutal reality is that a predator doesn’t have to be in the same room, building, or even country to abuse a child. And that’s what they’re doing — subjecting children to psychological and sexual abuse.”—“I’m a 37-Year-Old Mom & I Spent Seven Days Online as an 11-Year-Old Girl. Here’s What I Learned,” Medium

What can we do to protect America’s young people from sexual predators?

That’s the question I keep getting asked by people who, having read my article on the growing danger of young boys and girls (some as young as 9 years old) being bought and sold for sex, want to do something proactive to stop these monsters in their tracks.

It is estimated that the number of children who are at risk of being trafficked or have already been sold into the sex trade would fill 1300 school buses.

While those who seek to buy young children for sex come from all backgrounds, races, ages and work forces, they do have one thing in common: 99% of them are men.

This is not a problem with an easy fix.

That so many children continue to be victimized, brutalized and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved—except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

Sure, there are things that can be done to catch those who trade in young flesh: police need to do a better job of training, identifying and responding to these issues; communities and social services need to do a better job of protecting runaways, who are the primary targets of traffickers, and educating parents and young people about the dangers; legislators need to pass legislation aimed at prosecuting traffickers and “johns,” the buyers who drive the demand for sex slaves; and hotels need to stop enabling these traffickers, by providing them with rooms and cover for their dirty deeds.

However, these are reactive responses to a menace that grows more sophisticated by the day.

We need to be preemptive and proactive in our understanding of the threats and smarter and more sophisticated in our responses, as well.

What we are dealing with is a culture that is grooming these young children, especially young girls, to be preyed upon by men.

As Jami Nesbitt writes for Bark, “Grooming is the process by which someone befriends and gains the trust of a child (and sometimes the child’s friends and family) in order to take advantage of the child for sexual purposes.”

There are usually six stages to grooming by a sexual predator: friendship (targeting and gaining trust); relationship (filling the child’s needs); gauging the level of protection surrounding the child; exclusivity (isolating the child from others); sexualization (desensitizing the child to sex talk and activities); and abuse.

All of those screen devices being passed along to children at ever-younger ages? They have become the sexual predator’s primary means of gaining access to young people, and it’s primarily happening online. As The New York Times reports:

“Sexual predators have found an easy access point into the lives of young people: They are meeting them online through multiplayer video games and chat apps, making virtual connections right in their victims’ homes. Many of the interactions lead to crimes of ‘sextortion,’ in which children are coerced into sending explicit imagery of themselves.”

Indeed, video games such as Minecraft and Fortnite, social media apps such as TikTok and Instagram, and online chat forums have become “hunting grounds” for sexual predators.

Again from The New York Times:

“Criminals strike up a conversation and gradually build trust. Often they pose as children, confiding in their victims with false stories of hardship or self-loathing. Their goal, typically, is to dupe children into sharing sexually explicit photos and videos of themselves — which they use as blackmail for more imagery, much of it increasingly graphic and violent. Reports of abuse are emerging with unprecedented frequency around the country, with some perpetrators grooming hundreds and even thousands of victims.”

One Bark investigator, Sloane Ryan, a 37-year-old woman who poses as an 11-year-old girl online in order to better understand predation and help those who are fighting it, wrote a chilling account of the kinds of solicitations she received after merely uploading a generic photo (of her 11-year-old self) to Instagram. “By the end of two-and-a-half hours, I’ve had seven video calls, ignored another two dozen of them, text-chatted with 17 men (some who had messaged her before, gearing back up in hopes for more interaction), and seen the genitalia of 11 of those,” notes Ryan. “I’ve also fielded (and subsequently denied) multiple requests for above-the-waist nudity (in spite of being clear that Bailey’s breasts have not yet developed) and below-the-waist nudity.

This is the new face of how predators are grooming young girls (and boys) to be trafficked, molested and raped. However, it starts much earlier, with a culture that has brainwashed itself into believing that sexual freedom amounts to a Super Bowl half-time show in which barely-clad women spend 20 minutes twerking, gyrating (some of it on a stripper pole) and showing off sexually provocative dance moves.

This is part and parcel of the pornification of American culture.

As commentator Dixie Laite writes for Bust magazine:

Sex sells. Madonna knew it when she crawled the VMA stage very much not “Like a Virgin”. Rihanna, Beyonce, Britney and countless others have climbed that ladder to fame… Last time I looked, we as a nation absolutely adored this so-called slutty behavior. I see people voting with their dollars and their attention to Playboy’s Bunnies, Victoria’s Secrets, strippers, people who dress like strippers, and girls who’ve gone wild.

Pop culture and porn culture have become part of the same seamless continuum,” explains theatre historian and University of Illinois professor Mardia Bishop. “As these images become pervasive in popular culture, they become normalized… and… accepted.”

This foray into porn culture—the increasing acceptability and pervasiveness of sexualized imagery in mainstream media—is where pop culture takes a dark turn. “Visual images and narratives of music videos clearly have more potential to form attitudes, values, or perceptions of social reality than does the music alone,” notes author Douglas A. Gentile in his book Media Violence and Children. In fact, music videos are among the worst culprits constantly bombarding young people today with sexual images and references.

Screen time has become the primary culprit for the oversexualization of young people.

Little wonder when 8-to-12-year-olds spend almost 5 hours daily on screen media (teens rack up nearly 8 hours on screen devices) and that does not include time spent using those devices for school or homework.

A good chunk of that screen time is gobbled up by YouTube, which has been repeatedly red flagged by watchdog groups for peddling violent imagery, drug references, racist language and sexually suggestive content at young viewers.

Music videos overwhelmingly contain sexually suggestive materials, and with the advent of portable technology, children’s television and music are often unmonitored by parents or guardians. In fact, one study found that more than 80% of parents have caught young children repeating offensive lyrics or copying “porn-style” dance moves after being exposed to explicit pop music.

Numerous studies have found that exposure to sexual content in music, movies, television, and magazines accelerate adolescent sexual behavior: this is how young people are being groomed for sex by a predator culture.

As Jessica Bennett notes in “The Pornification of a Generation” for Newsweek:

“In a market that sells high heels for babies and thongs for tweens, it doesn’t take a genius to see that sex, if not porn, has invaded our lives. Whether we welcome it or not, television brings it into our living rooms and the Web brings it into our bedrooms… All it takes is one look at [social media] photos of teens to see examples—if they aren’t imitating porn they’ve actually seen, they’re imitating the porn-inspired images and poses they’ve absorbed elsewhere. Latex, corsets and stripper heels, once the fashion of porn stars, have made their way into middle and high school… Celebrities, too, have become amateur porn stars. They show up in sex tapes (Colin Farrell, Kim Kardashian), hire porn producers to shoot their videos (Britney Spears) or produce porn outright (Snoop Dogg). Actual porn stars and call girls, meanwhile, have become celebs. Ron Jeremy regularly takes cameos in movies and on TV, while adult star Jenna Jameson is a best-selling author.”

How we got to this place in time, where children are sexualized at an early age and trotted out as easy targets for all manner of predators is not really all that hard to decipher, but it requires a certain amount of candor.

First, there is nothing sexually liberating about young women—young girls—reducing themselves to little more than sex objects and prancing about like prostitutes.

Second, this is a dangerous game that can only end in tragic consequences: there are sexual predators out there only too eager to take advantage of any innuendo-laced sexual “invitations” being put out there, intentional or not.

Third, if it looks like porn, sounds like porn and imitates porn, it is porn, and it is devastating on every front, turning women into objects for male aggression.

Fourth, no matter what its champions might say about the First Amendment and women’s liberation, pornography in all its forms—whether overtly packaged as skin flicks and mags or more subtly disguised by pop culture as trendy music videos and precocious clothing—is about one thing only: money.

Fifth, parents: turn off your cell phones for a change and tune into what your kids are watching, reading, listening to, and whom they are emulating.

And finally, remember that the sexualization of young children is part of a larger continuum in America that runs the gamut from sexualized entertainment, the glorification of a pimp/ho culture, and a billion dollar sex industry built on the back of pornography, music, entertainment, etc., and ends with these same young people being bought and sold for sex. It is estimated that the porn industry brings in more money than Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Yahoo.

That this issue continues to be treated with a shrug, especially by those who claim to care about the state of our freedoms, is not only surprising and unnerving but also dangerously oblivious.

Like so many of the evils in our midst, sex trafficking (and the sexualization of young people) is a cultural disease that is rooted in the American police state’s heart of darkness. It speaks to a sordid, far-reaching corruption that stretches from the highest seats of power (governmental and corporate) down to the most hidden corners and relies on our silence and our complicity to turn a blind eye to wrongdoing.

You don’t have to be a parent to care about what’s happening to our young people. Likewise, you shouldn’t have to subscribe to any particular political viewpoint to recognize and be alarmed by the authoritarian trajectory of the nation.

Those concerned about the emerging police state in America, which I detail in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, should be equally concerned about the sex trafficking of young girls (and boys) and the pornification of America: they are two sides of the same coin.

As Aldous Huxley explains in his introduction to Brave New World:

As political and economic freedom diminishes, sexual freedom tends compensatingly to increase. And the dictator (unless he needs cannon fodder and families with which to colonize empty or conquered territories) will do well to encourage that freedom. In conjunction with the freedom to daydream under the influence of dope and movies and the radio, it will help to reconcile his subjects to the servitude which is their fate.

 

ABOUT JOHN W. WHITEHEAD

Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute. His new book Battlefield America: The War on the American People  is available at www.amazon.com. Whitehead can be contacted at johnw@rutherford.org.

https://www.rutherford.org/publications_resources/john_whiteheads_commentary/the_pornification_of_america_how_young_girls_are_being_groomed_by_sexual_predators


Children is [their] drug… #AdrenoChrome – Episode 4


VIDEO Child Sex Trafficking in America Issues: A Guide for Parents and Guardians

Report Child Sex Trafficking to the CyberTipline!

Overview

Child sex trafficking is the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, or advertising of a minor child for the purpose of a commercial sex act, which involves the exchange of anything of value – such as money, drugs or a place to stay – for sexual activity.  

While any child can be targeted by a trafficker, research has shown that traffickers often target children with increased vulnerabilities and prey upon a child’s vulnerability and use psychological pressure and intimidation to control, and sexually exploit, the child for financial benefit.  However, the issue of child sex trafficking is complex and not all instances of child sex trafficking involve an identified trafficker.  In such cases, it is the person buying sex from the child who exploits the child’s vulnerabilities. Traffickers and buyers of children for sex encompass all racial, socio-economic and cultural groups. Child sex trafficking has devastating consequences for its minor victims, including long-lasting physical and psychological trauma, disease, and/or even death.

A21 and NCMEC teamed up on the “Can You See Me” campaign to increase awareness that child sex trafficking is happening in plain sight. Victims of child sex trafficking are everywhere. Would you recognize the signs? Can you see them?

Risk Factors 

 

While any child can be targeted by a trafficker, research has shown that traffickers often target children with increased vulnerabilities, including:

  • Children who are chronically missing or who frequently run away (especially 3+ missing incidents)
  • Children who have experienced childhood sexual abuse, especially if the abuse was unreported or unaddressed, or resulted in the child being removed from the home
  • Children who have experienced prior sexual assault or rape  
  • Children with significant substance abuse issues or who live with someone who has significant substance abuse issues
  • Children who identify as LGBTQ and have been kicked out or who have been stigmatized by their family.

Red Flags

While no single indicator confirms the existence of child sex trafficking, several indicators combined can mean it is more likely that a child is being exploited or is actively being targeted and recruited.  That is why being aware of the following indicators is so important:

Behavioral Indicators

  • Child has a significant change in behavior, including increased virtual behavior, or associates with a new group of friends
  • Child avoids answering questions or lets others speak for him or her
  • Child appears frightened, resistant, or belligerent to law enforcement 
  • Child lies about his or her age and identity
  • Child looks to others before answering questions
  • Child does not ask for help or resists offers to get out of the situation (child does not self-identify as a victim)
  • Child seems coached in talking to law enforcement
  • Child uses trafficking-related terms like “Trick,” “The Life,” or “The Game”
  • Child is preoccupied with “getting money” (e.g., displaying photos of cash)

Physical Indicators

  • Child has multiple cell phones and/or electronic devices
  • Child has large amounts of cash or pre-paid credit cards
  • Child has no ID, or ID is held by another person 
  • Multiple children are present with an unrelated male or female
  • Child has unusual/unexplained sexual paraphernalia (such as bulk condoms or lubrication) (More +)
  • There is evidence the child has been or will be traveling (child is living out of suitcases, at motels, or in a car)
  • Child has a name or symbol tattooed, burned, or branded onto his or her body, particularly when coupled with the child’s reluctance to explain the tattoo, the child’s tattoo matches other children’s tattoos, the tattoo indicates money or ownership (ex. MOB, barcode or $)
  • Child references traveling to other cities or states or is not from the current location; the child may also lack knowledge of his or her travel plans, destinations, and/or his or her current location.
  • Child has hotel keys, hotel receipts, or other items from a hotel/motel
  • Presence of an overly controlling or abusive “boyfriend” or older female
  • Child is recovered at a hotel, street track, truck stop, or strip club
  • Child has notebooks or slips of paper containing phone numbers, dollar amounts, names, or addresses
  • Child has items or an appearance that does not fit his or her current situation (e.g., a homeless or runaway child who has money, electronics, new clothes or shoes, and who has his or her hair and nails done)
  • Child references online classified ads or escort websites
  • Child references traveling job opportunities (including modeling, singing and/or dancing in a music group, or magazine sales crew)
  • Child has unaddressed medical issues or who goes to the ER or clinic alone, or with an unrelated adult.

By the Numbers

Of the more than 23,500 endangered runaways reported to NCMEC in 2018, one in seven were likely victims of child sex trafficking.

Today, the average age of child sex trafficking victims reported missing to NCMEC is only 15 years old.

Child sex trafficking has been reported in all 50 U.S. States. 

What NCMEC is Doing About it

Providing a Specialized Response

NCMEC provides specialized technical assistance, analysis and recovery services on cases involving child sex trafficking, including:

  • reviewing CyberTipline reports related to child sex trafficking;
  • assisting on cases of missing children involved in, or at risk of, trafficking;
  • providing technical assistance and training to help with the identification, location and provision of recovery planning and services to victims of child sex trafficking 
  • supporting the recovery of victims by making referrals for post-recovery resources and services for child sex trafficking victims and their families
  • providing peer-to-peer support for families of child sex trafficking victims

Training Professionals on How to Identify and Respond to Child Sex Trafficking

NCMEC provides specialized child sex trafficking training for law enforcement and educators to help identify and respond to child sex trafficking that can be provided online or in-person. To learn more about our training options and to apply, click here.

Helping Survivors Rebuild Their Lives with Hope Bags

Often, when child victims of sex trafficking are recovered, they have only the clothes on their backs. NCMEC provides “Hope Bags” to survivors, filled with basic necessities, such as toiletries, a change of clothes and shoes, and snacks, to help ensure they have all they need in the hours and days after they are recovered.

Your donation provides survivors with a Hope Bag and other valuable resources to rebuild their lives. Your support will contribute towards our mission to help bring an end to child sexual exploitation and find the missing.

$10 provides all new toiletries
$15 provides snacks, a journal, and a food gift card
$25 provides a fresh change of clothes and shoes
$55 provides a complete Hope Bag

   

Building Awareness about the Issue


WHAT IS CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING?

Child sex trafficking occurs when a child under 18 is involved in a commercial sex act where sex is traded for money, food, shelter, drugs or anything else of value. This crime is occurring in all types of communities throughout the United States and traffickers are making an alarming profit while victims endure countless days and nights of rape, abuse, torture and violence.

It’s important to remember that even if the child believes it was his or her choice, they are a victim, and an adult or perpetrator is exploiting their vulnerabilities. A child cannot consent to sex with an adult. As such there is no such thing as child prostitution and that phrase should never be used when referring to child sex trafficking.

 

KNOW THE WARNING SIGNS

Children frequently do not reveal their victimization because they’re being manipulated by a trafficker who has physical and psychological control over them, or out of the shame and guilt that may exist as a result of their exploitation. Parents and guardians should familiarize themselves with some of the indicators of child sex trafficking.

CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING INDICATORS

·         Large amounts of cash, multiple cell phones or hotel keys;

·         A history of running away or current status as a runaway;

·         Tattoos or branding related to money or ownership and/or the child is unwilling to explain;

·         Signs of current physical abuse and/or multiple sexually transmitted diseases;

·         Presence of, or communication with, a controlling older boyfriend or girlfriend;

·         Gang involvement, especially among girls;

·         Travel to other states or staying at hotels when he or she runs away.

For a full list of indicators visit http://www.missingkids.org/theissues/cse/cstt

HOW TO KEEP YOUR CHILD SAFE

One of the most important things you can do to protect your child is to create an environment in which he or she feels comfortable talking with you. Open communication is key. Help make your children more aware by explaining the dangers of sex trafficking and by challenging myths and misconceptions that glamorize commercial sex. This includes having conversations with them about online safety and how traffickers/pimps use social networking sites and apps to mask not only their appearance but also their true intentions while recruiting new victims.

Do you trust the people with whom your child interacts? Knowing who your child is with is always crucial to protecting his or her safety. Also, it’s very important to monitor what your child does and who your child is interacting with on the internet.

Lastly, if something doesn’t seem right, ask questions!

Child Sex Trafficking in America

HOW DOES A CHILD BECOME A VICTIM?

Child sex trafficking victims could be anyone your daughter, neighbor, or nephew. Traffickers recruit victims in schools, online through social media, at shopping malls, bus stations or even foster care or group homes.

Perpetrators of sex trafficking often target children believing their age makes them easier to manipulate and control.

Factors that make children particularly vulnerable include:

  • A history of sexual abuse. Traffickers will work to identify any vulnerability in a child’s life and use that to create a closer bond to the child and to maintain future control;
  • A history of running away or current status as a runaway; and
  • An unstable home life and/or involvement in the child welfare or foster care system.

Pimps/traffickers may entice children using physical and psychological manipulation and sometimes violence. They will create a seemingly loving or caring relationship with his or her victim to establish trust and allegiance that remains even in the face of severe victimization.

WHO ARE THE PERPETRATORS?

Traffickers can be anyone who profits from the selling of a child for sex to a buyer, including: family members, foster parents, friends, gangs, trusted adults, or “boyfriends”.

Much of the trafficking of children has moved from street corners and truck stops to the internet, where children are sold for  sex. Online classified sites allow traffickers and buyers anonymity and accessibility when exploiting children. Further, societal glamorization of “pimp culture” may make a child less likely to recognize or be wary of manipulative behavior.

In some cases, there is no identified trafficker, and it is the person buying sex from the child who is exploiting the child’s vulnerabilities. For instance, if a child runs away, a buyer may exploit the child’s need for food and shelter offering to provide that in exchange for sex.

A child cannot consent to being bought and sold for sex, and anyone purchasing sex from a child is committing a serious crime.

If a child is missing, the child’s legal guardian should immediately call law enforcement and then the  National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST® (1-800-843-5678).

If you suspect a case of child sex trafficking, you can call 1-800-THE-LOST® or make a report at 
www.cybertipline.org.

Copyright © 2017 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. All rights reserved.

Click to access NCMEC%20CST%20fact%20sheet_ParentGuardian.pdf

 

The Essence of Evil: Sex with Children Has Become Big Business in America

 

Children are being targeted and sold for sex in America every day.”—John Ryan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Children, young girls—some as young as 9 years old—are being bought and sold for sex in America. The average age for a young woman being sold for sex is now 13 years old.

This is America’s dirty little secret.

Sex trafficking—especially when it comes to the buying and selling of young girls—has become big business in America, the fastest growing business in organized crime and the second most-lucrative commodity traded illegally after drugs and guns.

As investigative journalist Amy Fine Collins notes, “It’s become more lucrative and much safer to sell malleable teens than drugs or guns. A pound of heroin or an AK-47 can be retailed once, but a young girl can be sold 10 to 15 times a day—and a ‘righteous’ pimp confiscates 100 percent of her earnings.”

Consider this: every two minutes, a child is exploited in the sex industry.

According to USA Todayadults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in the United States.

Who buys a child for sex? Otherwise ordinary men from all walks of life.

They could be your co-worker, doctor, pastor or spouse,” writes journalist Tim Swarens, who spent more than a year investigating the sex trade in America.

In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 7,200 men (half of them in their 30s) seek to purchase sex with adolescent girls each month, averaging roughly 300 a day.

On average, a child might be raped by 6,000 men during a five-year period of servitude.

It is estimated that at least 100,000 children—girls and boys—are bought and sold for sex in the U.S. every year, with as many as 300,000 children in danger of being trafficked each year. Some of these children are forcefully abducted, others are runaways, and still others are sold into the system by relatives and acquaintances.

“Human trafficking—the commercial sexual exploitation of American children and women, via the Internet, strip clubs, escort services, or street prostitution—is on its way to becoming one of the worst crimes in the U.S.,” said prosecutor Krishna Patel.

This is an industry that revolves around cheap sex on the fly, with young girls and women who are sold to 50 men each day for $25 apiece, while their handlers make $150,000 to $200,000 per child each year.

This is not a problem found only in big cities.

It’s happening everywhere, right under our noses, in suburbs, cities and towns across the nation.

As Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children points out, “The only way not to find this in any American city is simply not to look for it.”

Don’t fool yourselves into believing that this is merely a concern for lower income communities or immigrants.

It’s not.

It is estimated that there are 100,000 to 150,000 under-aged child sex workers in the U.S. These girls aren’t volunteering to be sex slaves. They’re being lured—forced—trafficked into it. In most cases, they have no choice.

In order to avoid detection (in some cases aided and abetted by the police) and cater to male buyers’ demand for sex with different women, pimps and the gangs and crime syndicates they work for have turned sex trafficking into a highly mobile enterprise, with trafficked girls, boys and women constantly being moved from city to city, state to state, and country to country.

For instance, the Baltimore-Washington area, referred to as The Circuit, with its I-95 corridor dotted with rest stops, bus stations and truck stops, is a hub for the sex trade.

No doubt about it: this is a highly profitable, highly organized and highly sophisticated sex trafficking business that operates in towns large and small, raking in upwards of $9.5 billion a year in the U.S. alone by abducting and selling young girls for sex.

Every year, the girls being bought and sold gets younger and younger.

The average age of those being trafficked is 13. Yet as the head of a group that combats trafficking pointed out, “Let’s think about what average means. That means there are children younger than 13. That means 8-, 9-, 10-year-olds.

“For every 10 women rescued, there are 50 to 100 more women who are brought in by the traffickers. Unfortunately, they’re not 18- or 20-year-olds anymore,” noted a 25-year-old victim of trafficking. “They’re minors as young as 13 who are being trafficked. They’re little girls.”

Where did this appetite for young girls come from?

Look around you.

Young girls have been sexualized for years now in music videos, on billboards, in television ads, and in clothing stores. Marketers have created a demand for young flesh and a ready supply of over-sexualized children.

“All it takes is one look at MySpace photos of teens to see examples—if they aren’t imitating porn they’ve actually seen, they’re imitating the porn-inspired images and poses they’ve absorbed elsewhere,” writes Jessica Bennett for Newsweek. “Latex, corsets and stripper heels, once the fashion of porn stars, have made their way into middle and high school.”

This is what Bennett refers to as the “pornification of a generation.”

“In a market that sells high heels for babies and thongs for tweens, it doesn’t take a genius to see that sex, if not porn, has invaded our lives,” concludes Bennett. “Whether we welcome it or not, television brings it into our living rooms and the Web brings it into our bedrooms. According to a 2007 study from the University of Alberta, as many as 90 percent of boys and 70 percent of girls aged 13 to 14 have accessed sexually explicit content at least once.”

In other words, the culture is grooming these young people to be preyed upon by sexual predators. And then we wonder why our young women are being preyed on, trafficked and abused?

Social media makes it all too easy. As one news center reported, “Finding girls is easy for pimps. They look on MySpace, Facebook, and other social networks. They and their assistants cruise malls, high schools and middle schools. They pick them up at bus stops. On the trolley. Girl-to-girl recruitment sometimes happens.” Foster homes and youth shelters have also become prime targets for traffickers.

Rarely do these girls enter into prostitution voluntarily. Many start out as runaways or throwaways, only to be snatched up by pimps or larger sex rings. Others, persuaded to meet up with a stranger after interacting online through one of the many social networking sites, find themselves quickly initiated into their new lives as sex slaves.

Debbie, a straight-A student who belonged to a close-knit Air Force family living in Phoenix, Ariz., is an example of this trading of flesh. Debbie was 15 when she was snatched from her driveway by an acquaintance-friend. Forced into a car, Debbie was bound and taken to an unknown location, held at gunpoint and raped by multiple men. She was then crammed into a small dog kennel and forced to eat dog biscuits. Debbie’s captors advertised her services on Craigslist. Those who responded were often married with children, and the money that Debbie “earned” for sex was given to her kidnappers. The gang raping continued. After searching the apartment where Debbie was held captive, police finally found Debbie stuffed in a drawer under a bed. Her harrowing ordeal lasted for 40 days.

While Debbie was fortunate enough to be rescued, others are not so lucky. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children go missing every year (roughly 2,185 children a day).

With a growing demand for sexual slavery and an endless supply of girls and women who can be targeted for abduction, this is not a problem that’s going away anytime soon.

For those trafficked, it’s a nightmare from beginning to end.

Those being sold for sex have an average life expectancy of seven years, and those years are a living nightmare of endless rape, forced drugging, humiliation, degradation, threats, disease, pregnancies, abortions, miscarriages, torture, pain, and always the constant fear of being killed or, worse, having those you love hurt or killed.

Peter Landesman paints the full horrors of life for those victims of the sex trade in his New York Times article “The Girls Next Door”:

Andrea told me that she and the other children she was held with were frequently beaten to keep them off-balance and obedient. Sometimes they were videotaped while being forced to have sex with adults or one another. Often, she said, she was asked to play roles: the therapist patient or the obedient daughter. Her cell of sex traffickers offered three age ranges of sex partners–toddler to age 4, 5 to 12 and teens–as well as what she called a “damage group.” “In the damage group, they can hit you or do anything they want to,” she explained. “Though sex always hurts when you are little, so it’s always violent, everything was much more painful once you were placed in the damage group.”

What Andrea described next shows just how depraved some portions of American society have become. “They’d get you hungry then to train you” to have oral sex. “They put honey on a man. For the littlest kids, you had to learn not to gag. And they would push things in you so you would open up better. We learned responses. Like if they wanted us to be sultry or sexy or scared. Most of them wanted you scared. When I got older, I’d teach the younger kids how to float away so things didn’t hurt.”

Immigration and customs enforcement agents at the Cyber Crimes Center in Fairfax, Va., report that when it comes to sex, the appetites of many Americans have now changed. What was once considered abnormal is now the norm. These agents are tracking a clear spike in the demand for harder-core pornography on the Internet. As one agent noted, “We’ve become desensitized by the soft stuff; now we need a harder and harder hit.”

This trend is reflected by the treatment many of the girls receive at the hands of the drug traffickers and the men who purchase them. Peter Landesman interviewed Rosario, a Mexican woman who had been trafficked to New York and held captive for a number of years. She said: “In America, we had ‘special jobs.’ Oral sex, anal sex, often with many men. Sex is now more adventurous, harder.”

A common thread woven through most survivors’ experiences is being forced to go without sleep or food until they have met their sex quota of at least 40 men. One woman recounts how her trafficker made her lie face down on the floor when she was pregnant and then literally jumped on her back, forcing her to miscarry.

Holly Austin Smith was abducted when she was 14 years old, raped, and then forced to prostitute herself. Her pimp, when brought to trial, was only made to serve a year in prison.

Barbara Amaya was repeatedly sold between traffickers, abused, shot, stabbed, raped, kidnapped, trafficked, beaten, and jailed all before she was 18 years old. “I had a quota that I was supposed to fill every night. And if I didn’t have that amount of money, I would get beat, thrown down the stairs. He beat me once with wire coat hangers, the kind you hang up clothes, he straightened it out and my whole back was bleeding.”

As David McSwane recounts in a chilling piece for the Herald-Tribune: “In Oakland Park, an industrial Fort Lauderdale suburb, federal agents in 2011 encountered a brothel operated by a married couple. Inside ‘The Boom Boom Room,’ as it was known, customers paid a fee and were given a condom and a timer and left alone with one of the brothel’s eight teenagers, children as young as 13. A 16-year-old foster child testified that he acted as security, while a 17-year-old girl told a federal judge she was forced to have sex with as many as 20 men a night.”

One particular sex trafficking ring catered specifically to migrant workers employed seasonally on farms throughout the southeastern states, especially the Carolinas and Georgia, although it’s a flourishing business in every state in the country. Traffickers transport the women from farm to farm, where migrant workers would line up outside shacks, as many as 30 at a time, to have sex with them before they were transported to yet another farm where the process would begin all over again.

This growing evil is, for all intents and purposes, out in the open.

Trafficked women and children are advertised on the internet, transported on the interstate, and bought and sold in swanky hotels.

Indeed, as I make clear in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, the government’s war on sex trafficking—much like the government’s war on terrorism, drugs and crime—has become a perfect excuse for inflicting more police state tactics (police check points, searches, surveillance, and heightened security) on a vulnerable public, while doing little to make our communities safer.

So what can you do?

Educate yourselves and your children about this growing menace in our communities.

Stop feeding the monster: Sex trafficking is part of a larger continuum in America that runs the gamut from homelessness, poverty, and self-esteem issues to sexualized television, the glorification of a pimp/ho culture—what is often referred to as the pornification of America—and a billion dollar sex industry built on the back of pornography, music, entertainment, etc.

This epidemic is largely one of our own making, especially in a corporate age where the value placed on human life takes a backseat to profit. It is estimated that the porn industry brings in more money than Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Apple, and Yahoo.

Call on your city councils, elected officials and police departments to make the battle against sex trafficking a top priority, more so even than the so-called war on terror and drugs and the militarization of law enforcement.

Stop prosecuting adults for victimless “crimes” such as growing lettuce in their front yard and focus on putting away the pimps and buyers who victimize these young women.

Finally, the police need to do a better job of training, identifying and responding to these issues; communities and social services need to do a better job of protecting runaways, who are the primary targets of traffickers; legislators need to pass legislation aimed at prosecuting traffickers and “johns,” the buyers who drive the demand for sex slaves; and hotels need to stop enabling these traffickers, by providing them with rooms and cover for their dirty deeds.

That so many women and children continue to be victimized, brutalized and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved—except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

But the truth is that we are all guilty of contributing to this human suffering. The traffickers are guilty. The consumers are guilty. The corrupt law enforcement officials are guilty. The women’s groups who do nothing are guilty. The foreign peacekeepers and aid workers who contribute to the demand for sex slaves are guilty. Most of all, every individual who does not raise a hue and cry over the atrocities being committed against women and children in almost every nation around the globe—including the United States—is guilty.

https://www.rutherford.org/publications_resources/john_whiteheads_commentary/the_essence_of_evil_sex_with_children_has_become_big_business_in_america